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Voices of Extremism

Overview

Abstract

Scope and Contents

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American Courage Party

American Indian Movement

American Nazi Party

Anti-Communism

Attica Brigade

Black Muslim Movement

Blacklisting

Christian Crusade

Christian Defense League

Christian Nationalist Crusade

Citizens Council

Civil Rights

Communism

Communist Party USA

Extremism

Far Left (Emergency Civil Liberties Committee)

Fundamentalism

Illinois Communist Party

John Birch Society

Ku Klux Klan (1915-)

Labor Unions

May 2nd Movement

McCarthy Era

Muckraking

National Christian Publishers

National Renaissance Party

National Socialist Party

National States Rights Party

New Left

October League

Revolutionary Union

Rosenberg Trial

Socialism

Socialist Workers Party

Statecraft Movement

Student Committee for Travel to Cuba

Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)

World Socialist Party

Young Americans for Freedom

Young Socialist Alliance



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Voices of Extremism, 1948-1979 | Special Collections & Rare Books Room at Illinois State University

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Collection Overview

Title: Voices of Extremism, 1948-1979Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

Extent: 100.0 Items

Arrangement: The Voices of Extremism collection is grouped by affiliation of the person or persons being interviewed. Additional materials related to the collection and which are not currently online can be found in the Dr. Jo Ann Rayfield Archives.

Abstract

Voices of Extremism: Conflicting Ideologies in United States Politics in the Decades Following WWII is a unique audio documentation of the individuals and movements that characterized the Extremist politics in the United States in the decades following the Second World War from 1946 to 1980. The collection also includes a documentary on Industrial Union from 1904, recorded in 1964. Several of the movements represented in these recordings illustrate both the Far Left and the Far Right. They probe the rationales and styles of thinking of some of the most bizarre and interesting figures of mid-twentieth century American social and political history.

Scope and Contents of the Materials

by Walter B. Mead

In order for one to adequately comprehend the nature of extremism, audio recordings of the leading figures of extremist organizations are invaluable. For they convey to the listener not only the words and the content of the espoused ideologies (these are readily conveyed in the extensive printed material generated by most of these organizations) but also the emotions that play a major role in attracting and inspiring those who become adherents of these ideologies and movements.

It was for this reason that, during the 1960s and 1970s, in the course of conducting research, writing a book, and teaching seminars on American Political Extremism, Professor Mead compiled what probably constitutes today the most extensive audio documentation of the individuals and movements that characterized the full range — both left and right — of extremist politics in the United States in the decades immediately following the Second World War, from 1946 to 1980.

A majority of the recordings are of skilled interviews that Mead obtained and tape-transcribed from the late Gordon D. Hall, a Boston-based freelance investigator, speaker, and writer who devoted his entire career to gaining access — both personally and through confederates — to the most colorful fringe figures and groups of this period in American history.

Other recordings in the present collection are of interviews by professional journalists. There are also recordings — some clandestinely made — of speeches from political rallies. And there are a number of probing commentaries on the three and a half post-war decades of political turbulence — from Senator Joseph McCarthy's blacklisting in the 1940s and 1950s to the revival of the Ku Klux Klan at the end of the 1970s — by astute observers of the period.

All together, the recordings represent well over one hundred hours of oral history that probe into the rationales and styles of thinking of some of the most bizarre and interesting figures of mid-twentieth century American social and political history. In 2004, Walter Mead donated this collection to Illinois State University with the understanding that it would be made known and available to anyone, from the general public or from academic institutions, who is interested in making use of them.

Voices of Extremism: Conflicting Ideologies in United States Politics in the Decades Following WWII is a unique audio documentation of the individuals and movements that characterized the Extremist politics in the United States in the decades following the Second World War from 1946 to 1980. The collection also includes a documentary on Industrial Union from 1904, recorded in 1964.

Several of the movements represented in these recordings illustrate both the Far Left and the Far Right. They probe the rationales and styles of thinking of some of the most bizarre and interesting figures of mid-twentieth century American social and political history.

Collection Historical Note

Gordon D. Hall, 1921-2001: By Richard D. Hall

By any conventional yardstick, Gordon Hall’s rise to prominence as the country’s leading expert on Twentieth-Century American political extremism and dissent was improbable at best. Gordon was born in New York City the last of nine children at the beginning of the roaring 1920’s. Shortly after his birth, fate would deal Gordon, his mother and his eight siblings a devastating blow. His father was a successful industrial exhibitor and early dabbler in the motion picture industry who suffered a fatal heart attack on his walk to purchase the morning newspaper. Widowed at a relatively young age, left with nine children to support, with only meager savings, and no life insurance or social security to fall back upon, his mother began a sharp downward spiral.

Within a few years the big house in Queens, their two automobiles, and their domestic help were gone. Gordon’s mother turned to alcohol, and the older siblings fled one-by-one as soon as they were old enough to make their escape. By the time Gordon was twelve years old, the Great Depression had solidified its stranglehold on the nation’s economy, and an even greater depression was gripping the remnants of his tattered family. Coming home from grade school every day to find little food in the house and an intoxicated mother passed out on the living room couch, the younger siblings were forced to fend for themselves. Survival is a strong motivator and Gordon took a fulltime job at a local drugstore’s soda fountain as soon as he was old enough to be hired. He had just finished the Ninth Grade. He never again enrolled in school of any kind. Six decades later when Gordon read Frank McCourt’s searing autobiography Angela’s Ashes, he said it described his childhood perfectly.

By 1940 Gordon managed to make some modest but tangible improvements in his life prospects. He took an entry-level job as a payroll clerk at Grumman Aircraft Company on Long Island, met his future wife Dorothy, and cultivated a life long interest in jazz and sports, particularly baseball and basketball. But, in truth, there was nothing in his profile that would distinguish him from several million other American, depression-era men his age. Finishing high school apparently didn’t figure in his plans, and the idea of a college education, if it occurred to him at all, must have seemed as realistic as living in Shangri-La.

But life is about unexpected turns-of-event. Fate and fortune, which had been so cruel in early childhood, were about to open new doors for Gordon, even if he didn’t realize it at the time. The Great Depression would eventually be subsumed by the start of World War II. The most violent cataclysm of the Twentieth Century would soon bestow its surprising beneficence on Gordon Hall in a way most unexpected.

Drafted in 1942 into the Army-Air Force, he drew a lucky card right at the outset. Rather than being sent as so much cannon fodder to storm some South Pacific atoll or European beachhead, he got shipped to an advanced bomber base in the Aleutian Islands, that barren and frozen archipelago stretching off the Alaskan mainland.

But what would turn out to be his great stroke of good fortune could hardly have looked that way at the time. He was trained as a teletype operator, one tiny cog in a mind-numbing communications bureaucracy where individuality was frowned upon, if not actively discouraged. And the place itself was god awful. For more than 300 days of the year there was unremitting rain, fog or snow. There were no trees, virtually no vegetation and little to break the monotony of bitterly cold, dark winters, and dreary, rain-soaked summers. Most of the time, the bombers couldn’t even get into the air. It had all the makings of a soul crushing experience.

Then he saw the bulletin. His Army/Air Force base was recruiting a traveling basketball team to tour the islands. Gordon tried out and was selected. He would eventually become team captain. His selection might as well have been an admission to Harvard or Yale for the impact it would have on him after the war ended.

He was quickly transferred from the teletype pool to Special Services, an elite unit composed of writers, journalists, musicians, actors, entertainers and athletes like himself. He suddenly found himself surrounded by a worldly and sophisticated group of people with a broad frame of reference, a knowledge and understanding of the world, its politics and history. Everybody read books and passed them around. There were all night bull sessions about economics, the Spanish Civil War, capitalism versus Marxism, as well as music, art, and modern fiction. Of politics and history, Gordon knew nothing, absolutely nothing. He had never heard of the Spanish Civil War and wasn’t even certain where Spain was located. After the war, Gordon would joke that before he learned otherwise while in the Aleutians, he thought Generalissimo Franco referred to a brand of canned spaghetti.

Gordon was fascinated by this new circle of colleagues, and intellectually challenged. He began to read, and read voraciously. This is something he would do for the rest of his life. It served him well. He estimates he read more than 300 books during his tour of duty. He was insatiably curious, and luckily for him, quite gifted. He had a keenly analytical mind. He sorted through complex arguments, made connections and synthesized important information clearly and without cant.

Of the many influential people he met in his Special Services unit, one in particular was to play a pivotal role in his political maturation. Dashiell Hammett, the great American mystery writer, was both an elder statesman in the unit and Gordon’s commanding officer. He was also (although it was not widely known at the time) a member of the Communist Party of the USA.

In 1944 the US Armed Services were still racially segregated which meant their sports teams were as well. However, the segregated teams did occasionally play each other, and when they did, the African-American teams usually prevailed. As much out of self-interest for the team as any other motive, Gordon raised the issue with Hammett of pressing for an end to segregated teams in the Aleutians. It would make for better games, more competition, and greater interest from the troops, he argued. Knowing Hammett’s strong views concerning the injustice of segregation, he fully expected a sympathetic hearing, even if the change in policy was beyond their control. Gordon was in for a rude awakening. Hammett chastised him for not realizing that real social change can’t occur without powerful, emotional symbols to oppose. Without them, no movement can rally its forces. Racial segregation was one of the most potent of those symbols, and was therefore better left in place until the old, corrupt order could be swept away in the coming tide of revolutionary change.

As much as Gordon’s political philosophy had progressed during his Aleutian education, it hadn’t progressed this far. He wasn’t buying Hammett’s line. To Gordon it smacked of cynicism and hypocrisy. Some things were elementary. Segregation was clearly wrong and he believed, counterproductive. Gordon’s next step could be interpreted as either courageous or foolhardy, but it was characteristic of the integrity with which he would conduct himself through his subsequent career.

Unwilling to back down, he took Hammett on. Details of exactly what happened nearly seven decades ago are no longer conclusively known, but it’s safe to say it wasn’t a fair fight. Military hierarchies respect commanding officers, especially famous ones, over unknown corporals. Hammett was so angered by this insubordinate’s challenge that he not only stripped Gordon of his team-captain’s title, but he threw him off the basketball squad altogether. As an avowed atheist, Hammett inflicted one final punishment on Gordon. He assigned him the job of Chaplain’s Assistant, thereby removing this irritant from Special Services for the remaining months of the War.

Back in New York City after discharge, Gordon quietly resumed his job in the payroll office of Grumman Aircraft. As most returning veterans do the world over, soldiers recount their war experiences. By late 1946, his tale of political misadventure in the Aleutians brought him to the attention of one of the founding brothers of Grumman Aircraft and for a short time made him a minor celebrity with upper management.

Gordon was summoned to meet this politically active Grumman brother. The aircraft corporation was well known to be ultra-conservative and virulently opposed to collective bargaining, and was, in fact, the last major defense contractor to unionize. Mr. Grumman congratulated Gordon for standing up to Hammett, and gave him some unsolicited advice on what needed to be done to counter similar communist sympathizers. He suggested Gordon make a trip to Union, New Jersey to meet Conde McGinley who ran an organization that Grumman thought really understood the secret forces behind this kind of thinking. Armed with a personal introduction, Gordon felt he had nothing to lose. And his curiosity was piqued. He wanted to find out about this mysterious McGinley character for himself.

Sometime in 1947, he made the short trip. McGinley welcomed Gordon warmly and stated at the outset that the country needed more upstanding Aryan foot soldiers to beat back the Jewish/Communist threat to our shared Christian civilization. Gordon just listened. It was clear McGinley wasn’t looking for a dialogue, and McGinley (who published a virulently anti-semitic monthly newsletter Common Sense with a circulation approaching 50,000) simply assumed Gordon was eager to enlist in the struggle.

If Gordon’s earlier run in with Hammett was his first loss of political innocence, this encounter was an even greater eye-opener. Throughout his diatribe, McGinley let it be known that the Nazis had the right idea, but just pushed it a little too far. Years later, Gordon would say it was as if World War II hadn’t even been fought when listening to McGinley.

Wondering how many groups like this existed, Gordon stayed in touch with McGinley and soon found himself drawn into a semi-clandestine world of hate-mongers, rabid anti-communists, and white supremacists. It was during this phase of exploratory investigation that he developed a method of self introduction which was entirely truthful, but never failed to reassure those whom he was studying. He would simply declare that reading their publications and listening to their arguments gave him a much clearer understanding of the dangers threatening our freedom. It was an approach he and his associates would use to great effect throughout years of undercover investigation.

By 1948, he was ready to begin his life’s work. Gordon had come into contact with Leon Milton Birkhead, an activist Unitarian minister from the Midwest, who had founded an organization, Friends of Democracy, nine years earlier in New York City. Dedicated to fighting extremist movements on the right and the left, Birkhead’s organization was looking for someone to run a small satellite office in Boston, and hired Gordon for this task.

Taking his cue from Birkhead, Gordon set out to learn everything he could about these groups and individuals, and derail them through public exposure and education. He began keeping files, collecting hate literature, and cataloging the groups he learned about. These files would grow into the tens of thousands over the next 50 years. Although many of the groups were small and geographically isolated, they shared a few things in common which tended to exaggerate their strength and distort their political influence. They were secretive, disciplined, and fanatical. When they went on the attack, they could inflict disproportionate damage, especially if the target and public were taken by surprise.

Gordon quickly developed a coherent and effective political strategy. He believed you fought falsehood, paranoia, lies and bad ideas not with suppression and censorship; but with discernable truth, facts, and better ideas. It is one of the singular ironies of his life that this man with so little formal schooling, always retained an abiding commitment to rationality and an informed citizenry in the broadest sense.

It is worth noting that the study of political extremism was not part of the university lexicon at Mid-Twentieth Century. No courses were being offered in Political Science Departments. It was not an elective from the liberal arts curriculum. No one was writing dissertations on this subject. This field of study simply did not exist at the time.

Shortly after Gordon moved his young family to Boston, Friends of Democracy ran into big trouble. It became embroiled in a number of national libel suits, lost its tax exempt status, and disbanded for good in 1951. Fortunately for Gordon, however, he had made some crucial contacts during his brief employment in Boston. None was more important than Max Lerner, the renowned Professor of History at the newly founded Brandeis University in nearby Waltham, Massachusetts. Lerner suggested that Gordon continue his research and investigations, while supporting his work and family through public lecture tours, which Lerner would help sponsor while Gordon got started.

As improbable as Gordon’s career path turned out to be, he went on to become the nationally recognized expert on Twentieth Century American Political Extremism. Over the next forty years, he gave thousands of lectures across this country at schools and colleges, civic and church groups, and business and professional organizations. He wrote hundreds of op-ed pieces for major daily newspapers and worked closely with many well known scholars, journalists, civic, religious and political leaders. These included Senator J.William Fulbright, President Gerald R. Ford, Walter Reuther of the UAW, Walter Cronkite of CBS, Arthur Schlesinger Jr. and Gordon Allport of Harvard University, Ben Bradlee of the Washington Post, and Norman Cousins of the Saturday Review to name just a handful.

The collection of interviews and recordings assembled here at Illinois State University by Professor Walter Mead is a representative and important piece of Gordon Hall’s legacy and life’s work.

About the author: Richard D. Hall is Gordon Hall’s son. He vividly remembers his childhood growing up in Boston during the 1950’s and early 1960’s. His father worked at home where news and current events were the daily topic of conversation around the dinner table. Richard studied political philosophy at Lake Forest College and University of Massachusetts, and earned a Masters Degree in Public Administration at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. After a life-long involvement in politics, public policy and community development, Richard is now an online bookseller in Boston.

14 June 2011

Administrative Information

Repository: Special Collections & Rare Books Room at Illinois State University

Access Restrictions: Some interviews may be listened to through the web by accessing them on the Voices of Extremism page on the Milner Library Digital Collections site.  Other interviews, due to copyright restrictions, may only be listened to by visiting Milner Library.  Patrons wishing to listen to these interviews should use a computer terminal at Milner Library.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: American Courage Party],
[Series 2: American Indian Movement],
[Series 3: American Nazi Party],
[Series 4: Anti-Communism],
[Series 5: Attica Brigade],
[Series 6: Black Muslim Movement],
[Series 7: Blacklisting],
[Series 8: Christian Crusade],
[Series 9: Christian Defense League],
[Series 10: Christian Nationalist Crusade],
[Series 11: Citizens Council],
[Series 12: Civil Rights],
[Series 13: Communism],
[Series 14: Communist Party USA],
[Series 15: Extremism],
[Series 16: Far Left (Emergency Civil Liberties Committee)],
[Series 17: Fundamentalism],
[Series 18: Illinois Communist Party],
[Series 19: John Birch Society],
[Series 20: Ku Klux Klan (1915-)],
[Series 21: Labor Unions],
[Series 22: May 2nd Movement],
[Series 23: McCarthy Era],
[Series 24: Muckraking],
[Series 25: National Christian Publishers],
[Series 26: National Renaissance Party],
[Series 27: National Socialist Party],
[Series 28: National States Rights Party],
[Series 29: New Left],
[Series 30: October League],
[Series 31: Revolutionary Union],
[Series 32: Rosenberg Trial],
[Series 33: Socialism],
[Series 34: Socialist Workers Party],
[Series 35: Statecraft Movement],
[Series 36: Student Committee for Travel to Cuba],
[Series 37: Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)],
[Series 38: World Socialist Party],
[Series 39: Young Americans for Freedom],
[Series 40: Young Socialist Alliance],
[All]

Series 1: American Courage PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: George C. Wallace, 1919-1998.Add to your cart.
Biography: George C. Wallace (1919-1998) was a politician who served several terms as Governor of Alabama and made bids for President of the United States. His racial views and record during his political career were contradictory. On the one hand he actively spoke out against the Ku Klux Klan and was considered a racial moderate in his roles a judge, and these positions were costly to him in his early political career. On the other hand, he was a staunch supporter of racial segregation, and used the phrase segregation forever in his inaugural speech as Governor in 1963. Later that year he physically stood in a school doorway, blocking the entrance when four black children attempted to enter; he later stood aside after being confronted by federal marshals and the National Guard. Later in his life he sought forgiveness for his position and stated that his motivation for opposing integration was a stand for state rights and not about racism.
Item 1: Speech at a Political Rally in New York City, 21 September 1971.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Gov. George Wallace speaks at a political rally in New York City in September 24, 1971. He discusses, but does not announce his 1972 presidential candidacy. Wallace touches on many issues: taxation, civil rights, Red China, United Nations, Castro, welfare, law and order, and Prime Minister Trudeau of Canada who he alleges is a communist. Much of the first half of the speech praises the newly earned respect for the South held by current politicians and journalists, ridicules the New York Times and academia, pits common sense vs. the intelligentsia, and touts populist superiority and wisdom.
Subject/Index Terms:
Castro, Fidel, 1926-
Trudeau, Pierre Elliott.
Communist China.
Political campaigns.
Populism.
Presidential candidates.
Taxation.
Blacks--Segregation.
International relations--History--20th century.
International relations--Political aspects.
Propaganda, Communist--China.
Race discsrimination--United States.
Segregation--United States.
Tax incentives--Law and legislation.
Series 2: American Indian MovementAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Bellecourt, Vernon, 1931-2007Add to your cart.
Biography: Vernon Bellecourt (1931-2007) was one of 12 children. He lived a difficult life in a home with no running water or electricity. After being arrested at age 19 for robbery, he ran two beauty parlors upon his release from prison. His businesses were highly successful, and he later moved to Colorado and became wealthy in the real estate business.
Item 1: Interview, Pacifica Radio. American Indian Movement, spring 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Vernon Bellecourt, director of The American Indian Movement (AIM) and representative to the United Nations of the Ojibwe (Chippewa) Nation, comments on the ongoing occupation of Wounded Knee, the goals and recent activities of AIM, and the history of abuse of the Native American by the US government. Bellecourt discusses welfare, land issues, life expectancy, social status and living conditions on the reservation. He describes the Native American respect for the land, religion, freedom, and spirituality, the need for revolution within the system, and he tells of an old prophesy that the 'red man' will return as sovereigns to the land.
Subject/Index Terms:
Chippewa Tribe.
Wilson, Richard A., 1934-
American Indian Movement.
Indian activists.
Oglala Indians.
Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota.
Ojibwa Indians.
Indians of North America--Government relations--1934.
Wounded Knee (S.D.)--History--Indian occupation, 1973.
Series 3: American Nazi PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Karl Allen.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Karl R. Allen, native of Tallahassee, Florida had been appointed new Deputy Commander of the American Nazi Party shortly after Rockwell returned from Britain in September 1962. However, Allen soon rejected Rockwell’s preference for Hitler. He seceded and founded his American White Party later in April 1964, about three years before Rockwell's assassination.
Item 1: Interview. Speaking about the murder of George Lincoln Rockwell, 26 April 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Karl Allen, a former deputy commander of the American Nazi Party (ANP), is interviewed about the murder of George Lincoln Rockwell in 1967.  Allen maintains that the convicted murderer, John Patler, is innocent.  In the course of the discussion Allen reveals interesting details about the ANP headquarters and its infighting, introduces other possible murder suspects and/or groups, the succession of ANP leadership and his own White Party of America.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
White Party of America.
Patler, John.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Nationalism.
National Socialism--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Christopher BaileyAdd to your cart.
Biography:  Christopher Bailey was a member of the American Nazi Party and close associate of George Lincoln Rockwell. He became disillusioned with the party and Rockwell over time and parted ways with them. He did not believe that the investigation into Rockwell's assassination was thorough or correct and performed one of his own, determining that Rockwell was killed by rivals within the party itself.
Item 1: Interview. Bailey and the American Nazi Party, 26 April 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Christopher Bailey, a former member of the American Nazi Party discusses his affiliation with the Party and the workings of the party during the mid-1960’s. His belief that “racism had something to do in the decline of civilizations” motivated him to join the party. Interview topics include: homosexuality, party membership and number of members, the murder of George Lincoln Rockwell, and Bailey’s belief in white supremacy.
Subject/Index Terms:
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Conservatives.
Race discrimination.
Racism.
Homosexuality--Societies, etc.
Homosexuality--United States.
National Socialism--United States.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967--Assassination.
Segregation--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Sub-Series 3: Henry Bolduc, d. 2011.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Not available.
Item 1: Interview. The American Nazi Party, 12 September 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Henry Bolduc (d. 2011) describes his association with the American Nazi Party in this interview with Gordon Hall. He was a member of the American Nazi Party in 1965. At the time of this interview in 1967, Bolduc was no longer a member of the party, but still felt an association with them. He discusses his views on the recent assassination of George Rockwell, on the future of the party, on the John Birch Society, on newspaper propaganda, and on his ideal image of America.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
John Birch Society.
Southern Rhodesia.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Hitler Youth.
Press and propaganda.
Jews--United States--Economic conditions.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967--Assassination.
United States--Economic Aspects--1961-1971.
Sub-Series 4: John Patler, 1938-Add to your cart.
Biography: Not available.
Item 1: John Patler interview, 17 February 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  John Patler was the convicted assassin of George Lincoln Rockwell, the leader of the American Nazi Party. In this interview, conducted by Gordon Hall, Patler talks about his involvement in the American Nazi Party, his relationship with Rockwell, and being convicted of the assassination.
Subject/Index Terms:
American National Party.
American Nazi Party.
National Socialist White People's Party.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Sub-Series 5: George Lincoln Rockwell, 1918-1967.Add to your cart.
Biography: George Lincoln Rockwell (1918-1967) was the founder of the American Nazi Party. After dropping out of Brown University to join the U.S. Navy during WWII; he worked in advertising, publishing, and graphic design. After completing a second term in the navy after being recalled to active duty, Rockwell resumed his graphics career and became active in organizations dealing with responses to perceived Communism and Jewish conspiracies to control the United States government. Rockwell formed the American Nazi Party (originally the World Union of Free Enterprise National Socialists (WUFENS) in 1959. This organization attained national attention and expanded its efforts to include advocating racial segregation. Rockwell generated attention by speaking at a variety of rallies and other appearances with increasingly hostile rhetoric. He eventually inspired dissent with the ranks of his own organization with his degree of extremism, and was killed by a former top lieutenant and confidant in 1967.
Item 1: Interview. Leader of the American Nazi Party, 21 October 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Rockwell states that his message is not about hate but rather love for his people. He does not want to see his people outnumbered by any non-white minority. He believes that Hitler was a great leader who organized people even if they thought of him to be evil. The American Nazi Party (ANP) is not an agent of a foreign power. Neither is it trying to overthrow the United States government by force. Memberships of the ANP are kept small as beliefs and values are considered extreme. However, once the conditions of being in the United States will have deteriorated enough, people will finally recognize that Nazi beliefs are correct and the party will grow and dominate. Rockwell advocates free speech, that all should have the right to preach their doctrines, including Communists. He states: Where free speech ends, conspiracy begins."
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
Communist strategy.
Third parties (United States politics)
Freedom of speech--United States.
Nazism--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Item 2: Speech on the formation of the American Nazi Party, November 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Rockwell expresses his thanks for being allowed to speak at Brown. He portends that many of the people in the audience are being deceived, as he was, and that they are supporting movements which are destroying the United States. Rockwell argues that Jews and Communists have undermined governments and law and order in numerous countries throughout history. He presents a few documents and articles to support his position and states that by being heckled, yelled at, and denied the opportunity speak, and that this has been done because the Communists, Jews, and their followers do not want the truth revealed. Rockwell’s tone in this address is calm and rational for this audience. He uses intellectual means to persuade the audience of his views rather than emotional, offensive language.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
Antisemitism.
Communism and mass media.
Communist strategy.
Conservatives.
Blacks--Relocation.
Chicago--Kent College of Law--Newsletters.
Communism--Russia.
Communism--United States.
Communist leadership--China.
Freedom of speech--United States.
National Socialism--United States.
Item 3: Interview. Opinion and views on race and politics, 11 September 1963.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  George Lincoln Rockwell was the founder of the American Nazi Party. He was and still is an influential figure among the white nationalists and neo-Nazis. In this interview conducted by Gordon Hall, Rockwell discusses his views on the Jewish people, on Communists, and the American Nazi Party.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
Communism.
Judaism.
Sub-Series 6: Francis Joseph Smith.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Francis Joseph 'Frank' Smith was Rockwell's personal bodyguard. Both men had respect for one another. Smith worshiped Rockwell, who in turn called him the "Holy Father."
Item 1: Interview. Discussion of his work with George Lincoln Rockwell, 24 March 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Gordon Hall interviews Frank Smith, close associate and friend of George Lincoln Rockwell. Smith reveals the inner workings and daily operations of the American Nazi Party and George Lincoln Rockwell's life. While Smith revered Rockwell, he is very critical of most of the other party workers and operatives, who he refers to as "rejects" and "seedy" among other terms. Smith describes traveling with Rockwell and various aspects of security problems. Smith discloses that Rockwell had suspicions about party members shortly before an assassination attempt. Smith also discusses Rockwell's eventual murder and who he believes the killers really were.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Jews--Segregation.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967--Assassination.
Item 2: Discussion about the death of George Lincoln Rockwell, 24 April 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Smith who testified in the murder conviction of John Patler discusses his investigation into the death of George Lincoln Rockwell. He also revealed the incident of a shooting by Christopher Vidnjevich from Virginia who drove to Ellsworth Falls, ME with a car assigned to his name from the American Nazi Party (ANP) to shoot at Smith. As a whole, Smith does not believe in the integrity in this country.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
Koehl, Matt (Matthias Koehl Jr.), 1935-
Patler, John (John Patsalos), 1938-
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Vidnjevich, Christopher.
Evidence, Expert.
Trials (Assassination).
Blacks--Civil rights.
Blacks--Relocation.
Murder--Investigation.
Series 4: Anti-CommunismAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Edgar C. Bundy, Herbert A. Phillbrick, 1915-1993, and E. Merrill Root, 1895-1973.Add to your cart.
Biography: Edgar C. Bundy II attended Wheaton College in the late-1930s. During World War II, he served in the Flying Tigers in Asia and as an intelligence officer from 1942 to 1946. Ordained Baptist minister, Bundy "styled himself" as the General Chairman of the Church League of America with headquarters in Wheaton, IL. His livelihood came from his non-profit organization to fund his world travels preaching against Communism. Edward Merrill Root was a poet and taught English literature for forty years in Earlham College. He became an active rightist and wrote 'Collectivism on the Campus' to warn people of the Communist threat to the nation's educational system, that so many avowed Communists had penetrated the system. Herbert Arthur Philbrick was a Boston area advertising executive and was paid by the FBI to infiltrate the Communist Party USA between 1940 and 1949. This career as a spy came to an end in 1949 when he was used as a witness in court regarding the Smith Act prosecutions. Philbrick was also a devoted Baptist who often spoke at Mindszenty events.
Item 1: Interview.  Leading Conservative Speakers, 1960s.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. In this syndicated radio program, Phyllis Schlafly interviews leading conservative speakers Herbert Philbrick, E. Merrill Root, and Edgar C. Bundy to discuss communism in the United States as being a growing danger.
Subject/Index Terms:
Hoover, J. Edgar (John Edgar), 1895-1972.
Communist strategy.
Anti-communist movements--United States.
Communism--United States.
Conservatism--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Kenneth Goff, 1915-1972.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Two decades or so prior to Kenneth Goff's sermon in December 1960 on the Soldiers of the Cross and anti-communism, Goff (1915-1972) had been a member of the American Communist Party. Soon after becoming a Christian, Goff began public speaking and giving testimony on the 'Red Menace'. He was a close associate of Gerald L.K. Smith and founded his own organization in 1950, the Soldiers of the Cross Training Institute. By then, his politics and religious writings had begun to shift to the far-right and the causes of neo-nazism grew.
Item 1: Sermon.  Anti-communism and anti-semitic rationale, December 1960.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Goff, a founder of the radical right group Soldiers of the Cross Institute, gives a lecture (sermon) that is duplicated and sent to churches for use in Bible studies and broadcast on radio stations around the country. He touches on the following topics: 1960 presidential election, Ecumenical Council at the Vatican, Quaker call for disarmament while focusing on his main topics such as the evils of Communism and Jews, and the supremacy of the white race.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-communist movements.
Antisemitism.
Political campaigns.
Christianity--United States--20th century.
Good and evil--Religious aspects.
Presidents--Elections.
Sub-Series 3: Josef Mlot-Mroz.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Joseph Mlot-Mroz was a Polish immigrant. He was heavily involved with Polish anti-Communist movements. He and his group of Polish Freedom Fighters provided an alternative viewpoint, however Mlot-Mroz was more extreme than most other Polish groups. His actions led him to either be arrested or flee at protests and rallies, singing God Bless America and carrying anti-Communist signs or carrying a Wallace sign in Boston on October 1968.
Item 1: Interview. Anti-Communism and discrimination, 19 November 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Josef Mlot-Mroz was anti-communist activist. He believed that Communism was operated by Jews and that the ideology was intended to bring down Christianity. Mlot-Mroz claimed that he was arrested at protests while singing God Bless America and carrying anti-Communist signs, but interviewer Hall pointed out that his signs were anti-Semitic and that the organization Mlot-Mroz lead was in fact mainly limited to one person, Mlot-Mroz, who was often the only person representing it.
Subject/Index Terms:
McCarthy, Joseph, 1908-1957.
McNamara, Robert S., 1916-2009.
Stalin, Joseph, 1879-1953.
Anti-Jewish propaganda.
Antisemitism.
Anti-communist movements--United States.
Freedom of speech--United States.
Student movements--United States.
Sub-Series 4: Herbert A. Philbrick, 1915-1993.Add to your cart.
Biography: Herbert Philbrick (1915-1993) infiltrated the Communist Party in 1941. He was undercover to the FBI until 1949 when he testified under the Smith Act against Communist leaders in the United States, sending many, including Gus Hall, to jail. Through the Communist Party he campaigned for Henry Wallace, a presidential candidate for the Progressive Party in 1948. Based on his autobiography “I Lead 3 Lives” a TV show and movie were made using the same title.
Item 1: Interview.  Communists on Campus, 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. A fighter of communism Philbrick describes how he and others are recruited by communists through campus groups. He discusses the “Cambridge Youth Council, ” how anti-Vietnam demonstrations and the Watts Riots were fueled by communists, the communist W.E.B. DuBois Clubs of America, the weakening of the Smith Act through the Earl Warren court, and how communist ideology has lead to the increase in crime and vandalism in the United States. Through listener’s questions Philbrick explains communist infiltration of campus, peace, and civil rights groups. He defends the John Birch Society, decries the Warren Court and its liberal clerks, compares communist and criminal minds, and proposes education in all schools to teach students the devious ways and threats of communism.
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
Progressive Party (U.S. : 1948)
United States. Alien Registration Act, 1940.
W.E.B. Du Bois Clubs of America
Philbrick, Herbert Arthur, 1915-1993.
Anti-communist movements.
Civil rights--United States.
Communism--United States.
Sub-Series 5: Herbert A. Philbrick, 1915-1993, Frederick Charles Schwarz, 1913-2009.Add to your cart.
Biography: Herbert Arthur Philbrick was a Boston area advertising executive and was paid by the FBI to infiltrate the Communist Party USA between 1940 and 1949. This career as a spy came to an end in 1949 when he was used as a witness in court regarding the Smith Act prosecutions. Frederick Charles Schwarz was a physician from Australia who spent much of his life in the United States and became known for his Christian Anti-Communist Crusade. He studied Communism and all of its creators and proponents quite extensively and became known as an expert on the subject. In August of 1961 his Southern California School of Anti-Communism was well attended and attracted considerable attention. His language and rhetoric were blunt and considered inflammatory in some circles, notably the political left. He published several books and edited a newsletter for over 40 years. He eventually returned to Australia, where he died in 2009.
Item 1: Interview.  Boston Forum, 27 September 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Philbrick and Schwarz discuss their thoughts about communism on the radio program Boston Forum, on September 27, 1965.
Subject/Index Terms:
Communism.
Sub-Series 6: Dean Richards.Add to your cart.
Item 1: Speech. Oneida County Patriotic Society, 18 August 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Dean Richards speaks to the Oneida County Patriotic Society.
Subject/Index Terms:
African Americans--Civil rights.
Anti-communist movements.
Bushong, Albert.
Carmichael, Stokely.
Castro, Fidel, 1926-
Communism and society.
Cuba, Materialism--United States.
Daley, Richard (Richard Michael), 1942-
Douglas, Paul H. (Paul Howard), 1892-1976.
Epton, William Leo, 1932-2002.
Guevara, Ernesto, 1928-1967.
Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909.
Hoover, J. Edgar (John Edgar), 1895-1972.
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963.
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968.
Luce, Phillip Abbott, 1935-1998.
Manion, Clarence, 1896-1979.
Mindszenty, Jozsef, 1892-1975.
Propaganda, Anti-Soviet.
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945.
Socialism.
Tower, John G. (John Goodwin), 1925-1991.
Sub-Series 7: Robert C. Schwab.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Francis Joseph 'Frank' Smith was Rockwell's personal bodyguard. Both men had respect for one another. Smith worshiped Rockwell, who in turn called him the Holy Father.
Item 1: Interview. Anti-communist political views, 24 April 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Robert C. Schwab discusses his political views and his campaign of writing anti-communist letters to newspapers.
Subject/Index Terms:
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
Philbrick, Herbert Arthur, 1915-1993.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Communism and mass media.
Communist strategy.
Conspiracy theories.
Presidential candidates.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Blacks--Civil rights.
Sub-Series 8: Fred Schwarz, 1913-2009.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Frederick Charles Schwarz (1913-2009) was physician from Australia who spent much of his life in the United States and became known for his Christian Anti-Communist Crusade. He studied Communism and all of its creators and proponents quite extensively and became known as an expert on the subject. In August of 1961 his Southern California School of Anti-Communism was well attended and attracted considerable attention. His language and rhetoric were blunt and considered inflammatory in some circles, notably the political left. He published several books and edited a newsletter for over 40 years. He eventually returned to Australia.
Item 1: Midnight with Marietta radio program.  Difficult, deviant and dangerous dialectic, 1961.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Dr. Schwarz lectures about communism on the ‘Midnight with Marietta’ radio program.
Subject/Index Terms:
Communism.
Item 2: Radio Talk, Pacifica Radio. Is C.A.C. the way to combat communism? (Crusade Against Communism), 3 April 1962.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Frederick Charles Schwarz, founder and director of the Christian Anti-Communism Crusade, discusses how Communism preys on discontent to undermine nations and expand. They are doing this today in the United States by appealing to young people who are spiritually weak and empty due to embracing sensualism. These individuals are seeking a cause and erroneously embrace Communism, believing that the United States is oppressing individuals in third-world nations when in fact the investments and development have had an opposite effect in them. These individuals are well-educated and become members of groups such as the Weathermen.
Subject/Index Terms:
Weather Underground Organization.
Weatherman (organization)
Whitaker, Urban G. (Urban George), 1924-
Anarchism.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Communist strategy.
Revolutionaries.
Christianity--United States--20th century.
Communism--United States.
Student movements--United States.
Series 5: Attica BrigadeAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Shelly Bogen and Tim DevineAdd to your cart.
Biography: In 1973, Tim Devine was a graduate working in Chicago and Shelly Bogen a senior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She was active in the Attica Brigade movements. The Attica Brigade first appeared in New York on November 6, 1971 when about 800 students marched with banners on an anti-war demonstration. It became an anti-imperialist organization in 1972 with a main focus to sensitizing university students to the threat of imperialism. The Revolutionary Union initiated that grouping in 1974. The Attica Brigade changed its name to the Revolutionary Student Brigade. As a whole, the Revolutionary Student Brigade stands for a revolutionary overthrow of the capitalist system and the institution of a socialist society that produces control to the efforts of their labor. Bogan argues on the importance of student movements to develop a powerful force to develop an understanding to become fighting allies in the fight against imperialism.
Item 1: Speech at Illinois State University, 5 December 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Tim Devine and Shelly Bogen are spokespersons for the Revolutionary Union and Attica Brigade, respectively. Both are anti-imperialist and anti-capitalist movements seeking to violently, if necessary, overthrow the dictatorship of the bourgeoisie. Struggling workers, blacks, students and women movements should unite against their common enemy: the capitalists. Some of their activities include supporting union strikes, aiding farm workers, organizing a new communist party in the U.S., rallying for the womens movement, working against the war in Vietnam, and civil rights.
Subject/Index Terms:
Attica Brigade.
Revolutionary Communist Youth Brigade (U.S.)
Revolutionary Student Brigade.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Communist ethics.
Revolutionaries.
Socialism.
Communism--United States.
Political activists--United States.
Student movements--United States--History--20th century.
Students--Political activity--United States.
Series 6: Black Muslim MovementAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Malcolm X, 1925-1965.Add to your cart.
Biography: Malcolm X was an "African-American Muslim minister, a public speaker, and a human rights activist." He was seen by supporters as an advocate for African-American rights, indicting white America "in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans." He was accused by critics of "preaching racism, black supremacy, anti-Semitism, and violence." Malcolm X was assassinated on February 21, 1965 in New York City.
Item 1: Malcolm X interview, 18 February 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Malcolm X, an African American Muslim minister, public speaker, and human rights activist, Aubrey Barnette, an ex-Muslim, and Gordon Hall, an expert on extreme organizations, discuss the Black Muslim movement on the radio program "Contact" with Stan Bernard. The interview takes place after Malcolm X has left the Black Muslim party and only a few days after his house was bombed.
Subject/Index Terms:
The Black Muslim Party.
Elijah Muhammad.
Malcolm X.
Propaganda.
Series 7: BlacklistingAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Cedric Henning Belfrage, 1904-1990.Add to your cart.
Biography: Cedric Belfrage (1904-1990) was born and raised in England and later moved to the United States. He was active in various radical and Communist organizations in the 1930s and formed the Guardian in the late 1940s. He was questioned by the FBI on his Communist affiliations in 1947. He was deported back to Britain in 1955 after refusing to discuss whether or not he was a Communist with the House Un-American Activities Committee. He moved to Mexico in the early 1960s and continued writing. He died in Mexico in 1990. In 1995 newly-released Soviet intelligence documents identified Belfrage as having covert relationships with Soviet intelligence. Lester Cole (1904-1985) was an American screenwriter. He joined the Communist Party in 1943. Later he refused to discuss his Communist memberships with the House Un-American Activities Committee and imprisoned for 10 months of a 12 month sentence. He was blacklisted and, in spite of writing many award-winning scripts in the past, was unable to sell any works for some time but later was able to regain his success. He died in 1985.
Item 1: Interview, Pacifica Radio. The Hollywood Ten, 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  This tape is a discussion between a deported British journalist and a formerly imprisoned Hollywood writer about their encounters with McCarthyism.  Lester Cole was an American screenwriter and was one of the Hollywood Ten, blacklisted and convicted of contempt of Congress. He served ten months in prison for his political beliefs. Cedric Belfrage was a socialist, author of American Inquisition, the co-founder of the National Guardian and its editor until 1955. Brought under suspicion for his involvement with the Communist Party in 1947, he was blacklisted and deported for his politics, speaking out against the Cold War, campaign to save the Rosenbergs, and his stand against HUAC and McCarthy.
Subject/Index Terms:
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.
Rosenberg family.
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963.
Einstein, Alfred, 1880-1952.
Marzani, Carl.
Rosenberg, Ethel, 1915-1953.
Rosenberg, Julius, 1918-1953.
Thomas, J. Parnell (John Parnell), 1895-1970.
Communism and mass media.
Communism and motion pictures.
Subversive activities.
Anti-communist movements--United States.
Blacklisting of authors--United States.
Blacklisting of entertainers--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Thomas A. Bolan, 1924-; Millard Lampell, 1919-1997; John Randolph, 1915-2004.Add to your cart.
Biography:  John Randolph (1915-2004) was an actor who was blacklisted in the anti-Communist fervor of the 1950s. After enjoying success in acting prior to WWII, he found that his embracing of leftist politics worked against him afterward. He was blacklisted in 1955 for refusing to answer questions before the House Un-American Activities Committee. As blacklisting faded in the mid-1960s resumed his career but felt that the damage done by blacklisting kept him from ever reaching his potential. Millard Lampell (1919-1997) was a screenwriter who was blacklisted in the 1950s. An outspoken leftist, he was critical of President Roosevelt, calling him a warmonger and also opposed Britain’s going to war against Nazi Germany. Like others, he refused to testify against himself before the House Un-American Activities Committee and was blacklisted and only regained acceptability in the movie industry in the 1960s and later. Thomas A. Bolan was the chief defense attorney for Aware, Inc., the leading organization in blacklisting in the entertainment industry. He argued that all he and Aware did was identify Communist sympathizers and that if the organization were to perform such a function for Nazis the practice would have been widely accepted.
Item 1: Panel discussion, Pacifica Radio. Will our past become our future?, 6 April 1972.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Speakers on this panel include actors and writers who were blacklisted as well as an attorney who defended the blacklisting process. The artists discuss the consequences of being blacklisted as well as the arbitrary methods used in adding or removing individuals from the list. On the other side, the attorney involved with blacklisting states that the American people have a right to know the political allegiances of people so that they can decide whether or not to patronize them. He argues all that the process did was call out Communists that people would want to boycott and that if such a practice were to be put in place for Nazi party members that there would be no objections.
Subject/Index Terms:
McCarthy, Joseph, 1908-1957.
Communism and mass media.
Communism and motion pictures.
McCarthyism.
Subversive activities.
Blacklisting of authors--United States.
Blacklisting of entertainers--United States.
Communism--United States--History.
Sub-Series 3: John Henry Faulk, 1913-1990.Add to your cart.
Biography: John Henry Faulk (1913-1990). His father was an attorney who advocated leftist political ideals and was affiliated with leftist political movements. In college, John Henry followed in his father’s footsteps, participating in various left political activities. After serving in the merchant marine, the American Red Cross, and the U. S. Army during WWII, Faulk built on material he wrote while serving and secured his own radio show. His popularity quickly increased and he moved into television and stage performances. His left-leaning tendencies immediately after the war opposing U.S. foreign policy and the Korean War brought him to the attention of AWARE, Inc. which added his name to blacklists, and he soon found it difficult to gain or keep employment in the entertainment industry. Faulk later sued AWARE, Inc. in 1956 for libel. The trial was stalled in legal maneuvering on the other side, but finally ended in 1962 with a $.5 million award for Faulk, later lowered to $500,000 in an appeal. Although he won the suit and helped set a precedent against blacklisting, he was subsequently seen as a controversial political personality and although he did find some regular work his entertainment career was diminished. He also spoke on the lecture circuit about blacklisting and related subjects.
Item 1: Speech, Pacifica Radio. Hollywood Blacklisting, 15 May 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  John Henry Faulk was a storyteller, humorist and CBS radio show host.  During the McCarthy anti-communist hunt he ran afoul of AWARE, Inc., a for-profit corporation used by the broadcast companies to find and then fire Communists within the industry.  Fired in 1957, a victim of blacklisting, he sued AWARE and finally won in 1962. He calls the "anti-communist hoax" a national madness, champions free speech, abhors the war in Vietnam, and tells it all with humor.
Subject/Index Terms:
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.
Bolan, Thomas A.
Nizer, Louis, 1902-1994.
Civil rights.
Communism and mass media.
Communism and motion pictures.
Hollywood blacklisting.
Subversive activities.
Vigilantism.
Blacklisting of authors--United States.
Blacklisting of entertainers--United States.
Freedom of speech--United States.
Presidents--United States--Election--1964.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest Movements--United States.
Series 8: Christian CrusadeAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Garman, W. O. H. (Wilford Ohlen Higget), 1899-Add to your cart.
Biography:  W. O. H. Garman (1899-1993) was an advocate for right-wing politics and took a strict Christian slant to the ideas of that persuasion. He fully supported the Vietnam War while advocating the use of force against those involved with the Civil Rights movement and others on the left and believed that violence and war are very necessary and desirable tools. Garman eschewed "Christian liberalism" and focused on what he referred to as core doctrines. He served as president of the Associated Gospel Churches from 1938 until he retired in 1981.
Item 1: Special message to Christian Crusade chapters around the country, November 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Born in Philadelphia in 1899, attended the  Philadelphia School of the Bible, where he  received a strong Fundamentalist biblical education.  Dr. W. O. H. Garman was an energetic minister of the gospel . He was most closely associated with the Associated Gospel Churches (AGC) for which he served as president from 1938 until his retirement in 1981. The AGC was formed in 1939 by a group of ministers in Michigan who separated from the Protestant Methodist Church. Hargis, founder of the Christian Crusade, introduces Garman and pitches tapes and bumper stickers sold by the Christian Crusade.  Garman's speech is entitled the "Folly of Disarmament." He  supports his belief that "Pacifism is not Christian"  by reading  Bible passages in the New and Old Testaments advocating war, promoting weapons carried by individuals, and using force.  He believes the U.S should have used force against agitators for civil rights, the "anarchists" from Watts and to quell other civil disruptions.
Subject/Index Terms:
Christian Crusade.
Anti-communist movements.
Pacifism.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Clergy--United States.
Firearms--Law and legislation.
Liberty--Religious aspects--Christianity--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Billy James Hargis, 1925-2004.Add to your cart.
Biography: Billy James Hargis (1925-2004) received a degree in theology from Burton College and Seminary in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He served as a pastor to a couple of churches before becoming pastor of the First Christian Church in Sapulpa, Oklahoma, in 1948. From there, he founded the Christian Echoes Hour radio. In 1950, he resigned to create a national ministry, the Christian Crusade Against Communism. His decision was pursued by the production of programs that ran on hundreds television and radio stations. However, his career was full of controversy. Not only was he an anti-communist, he was also a supporter of racial segregation, and reputedly held anti-Semitic and anti-Catholic views. Even so, he launched an attack on sex education programs in 1968, just to be accused in 1974 of sexual relations with students at his college.
Item 1: Recording. Christian Crusade recruitment, November 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Reverend Billy James Hargis, the founder of the conservative Christian Crusade, was a fundamentalist Christian broadcast evangelist who pledged to “expose anyone who has modernist, leftist, socialist or communist aims.” This recorded appeal to attract new members for the Christian Crusade, promotes a conservative political agenda, and urges Americans to follow the Founding Fathers in fighting a war against atheistic communism. Hargis champions lower taxes, elimination of foreign aid, less government, more states’ rights and opposes welfare, government involvement in education, and liberals. He describes the reach of the Christian Crusade through its radio broadcasts, TV spots, rallies, audio albums, books, weekly and monthly magazines, youth and adult chapters, conferences, education and pro-conservative films.
Subject/Index Terms:
Christian Crusade.
Anti-communist movements.
Christianity--United States.
Conservatism--United States.
Item 2: Speech. Back our Boys in Vietnam Project, 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Billy James Hargis, founder of Christian Crusade explains how the anti-war demonstrators are supporting communists.  He urges his listeners to support our soldiers in Vietnam and pushes for total victory.  Hargis is selling stickers and pamphlets to support sending letters and religious books to the U.S. soldiers.  General Walker speaks at the Christian Crusade leadership school in Tulsa defending our need to fight against communism in Vietnam while condemning President Johnson’s war strategy, his Great Society, and our liberal congress. Finally Hargis wraps up the session with a plea for involvement in defending the war.
Subject/Index Terms:
Christian Crusade.
Hargis, Billy James, 1925-
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
Wood, Wallis W.
Anti-communist movements.
Propaganda.
Liberalism--United States--20th century--History.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Literature and the war.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Public opinion.
Sub-Series 3: Billy James Hargis, 1925-2004 and Clyde J. Watts, 1907-1975.Add to your cart.
Biography: Billy James Hargis (1925-2004) received a degree in theology from Burton College and Seminary in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He served as a pastor to a couple of churches before becoming pastor of the First Christian Church in Sapulpa, Oklahoma, in 1948. From there, he founded the Christian Echoes Hour radio. In 1950, he resigned to create a national ministry, the Christian Crusade against communism. His decision was pursued by the production of programs that ran on hundreds television and radio stations. However, his career was full of controversy. Not only was he an anti-communist, he was also a supporter of racial segregation, and reputedly held anti-Semitic and anti-Catholic views. Even so, he launched an attack on sex education programs in 1968, just to be accused in 1974 of sexual relations with students at his college. In July 1964, Attorney Clyde J. Watts of Oklahoma City represented General Edwin A. Walker.
Item 1: Interview. God, Family, and Country Rally, July 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Both Hargis and Watts were avid anti-communists and believed that infiltration by communists would lead to the downfall of the United States. Communists are responsible for instigating and/or capitalizing on racial conflicts, student insurrections, riots in the cities, rise in availability of pornography, demise of religion, instigation of the war in Vietnam, lawlessness and the Kennedy assassinations. Hargis advocated a four party election in 1968, wanted to curb the power of the Supreme Court, believed the communists are waging a “fourth dimension” or psychological war and viewed the fight in the United States against communism as the fight of God vs. Satan. Watts believed communists use U.S. freedoms to cloak their subversion and as rodents the communists "cannot exist in the light."
Subject/Index Terms:
Christian Crusade.
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963.
Kennedy, Robert F., 1928-1968.
Anti-communist movements.
Presidential candidates.
Psychological warfare.
Christianity--United States.
Conservatism--United States.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Laos.
Series 9: Christian Defense LeagueAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Anonymous speaker.Add to your cart.
Biography: A substitute speaker summarizes the Swiftian (Dr. Wesley Swift) views of the Christian Defense League and their views of "false" belief systems and Antichristian movements.
Item 1: Anonymous speaker interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Speech on Anti-Christian movements, Christian Defense League, 1970. A substitute speaker summarizes the Swiftian (Dr. Wesley Swift) views of the Christian Defense League and their views of "false" belief systems and Antichristian movements.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-communist movements.
Christianity and politics.
Race discrimination.
Liberty--Religious aspects--Christianity--United States.
Religion and politics--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Wesley A. Swift, 1913-1970.Add to your cart.
Biography: Wesley Swift (1913-1970) was active in extreme right-wing groups. He began as a Ku Klux Klan organizer. In 1946, Swift started his own church, known as the Church of Jesus Christ Christian. He then became Reverend Gerald L. K. Smith's representative of the Christian Nationalist Crusade in Southern California. Reverend Wesley A. Swift and Colonel William Potter Gale were both behind the rise of the Christian Defense League. It later was officially incorporated in 1964 with Richard G. Butler as President, a long-term friend of Swift.
Item 1: Wesley A. Swift interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Speech on Anti-Christian movements.
Subject/Index Terms:
Cohen, Israel, 1879-1961.
Eisler, Gerhart.
Mullins, Eustace, 1923-2010.
X, Malcolm, 1925-1945.
Antisemitic hoax.
Antisemitism.
Belief and doubt.
Christian leadership.
Christianity and antisemitism.
Christianity and politics.
Religious adherents.
Responsibility.
Prophecy--Christianity.
Racism--United States.
Item 2: Wesley A. Swift interview, 1970.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Speech on Anti-Christian movements, Christian Defense League, 1970.
Item 3: Wesley A. Swift interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Speech on Anti-Christian movements, Christian Defense League, 1970.
Series 10: Christian Nationalist CrusadeAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Gerald L. K. Smith, 1898-1976.Add to your cart.
Biography: Gerald L. K. Smith (1898-1976) was a clergyman and right wing politician who believed in white supremacy. He was associated with a number of movements advocating extreme right-wing views, most notably the America First Party which he formed in 1943. Smith worked with Huey P. Long and took his place as the Share Our Wealth Society after Long’s assassination, but the society dissipated under his leadership. Smith was also a leading figure in the short-lived Union Party. Smith ran for the United States Senate in Michigan but did not win the primary. A later bid to run for President as the candidate from the America First Party in 1944 resulted in less than 2,000 votes. Subsequent attempts at the office won him far fewer votes in later years. Smith espoused anti-Communist and anti-Semitic views after WWII and politicians mostly distanced themselves from him. He formed the Christian Nationalist Party in 1948; like his other efforts this party did poorly. After leaving politics, Smith moved to Eureka Springs, Arkansas. In 1964 he began development of a religious theme park to be called Sacred Projects. Although some of the components of the project were briefly realized, the only remaining piece is the 67-foot tall Christ of the Ozarks statue, built in 1966. Smith died in 1976, convinced that races and groups he sought to eliminate were behind his political defeat rather than his own views. Smith and his wife are interned near the statue.
Item 1: Interview, Pacifica Radio. 'Crusader, Traitor or Neither', 1959.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Gerald L. K. Smith, speaker, journalist, and leader of the Christian Nationalist Crusade involved in white supremacy politics in the 1920s, is interviewed by Terry Drinkwater on Pacifica Radio in Berkeley in 1959.  The program is entitled  "Crusader, Traitor or Neither." Smith was a close friend of Huey Long, backer of Senator Joseph McCarthy, supporter of Charles Lindberg’s opposition to World War II, Smith called President F.D. Roosevelt a fascist who was jealous of Hitler, and considers the Anti-Defamation League a Gestapo organization that is a part of the international Jew communist conspiracy. Smith also advocates throwing the USSR out of the United Nations, standing up to the Soviets to get them out or Eastern Europe and asserting the supremacy and power of the United States.
Subject/Index Terms:
Christian Nationalist Crusade.
Long, Huey Pierce, 1893-1935.
McCarthy, Joseph, 1908-1957.
Anti-communist movements.
Antisemitism.
Christianity and politics.
Conservatism.
Nationalism.
New Right.
Blacklisting of authors--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Series 11: Citizens CouncilAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Richard Hamel.Add to your cart.
Biography: Reverend Richard Hamel dedicated himself to bring forth issues concerning Civil Rights Act and discrimination against blacks. Based in Boston, Massachusetts, Hamel created the Citizens Council in 1965. He expressively defended principles of freedom as well as equitable and fair treatment to all citizens in Boston. However, Hamel stated contradictory remarks when considering civil rights law and how it applies, such as in a business context where blacks conducted to work in a store owned by a white or such as 'a minority has been pushing us for too long.'
Item 1: Interview. Discussion About the Civil Rights Act and Discrimination, 7 September 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Richard Hamel describes his activity in politics, first as a young liberal interested in the Communist Party, and for the past twenty years as a far right conservative dedicated to the segregation of whites and blacks. He has headed two groups, the American Fascist Union in the 1950s and the two year old nearly defunct Citizens Council of Boston. Hamel has had contact with Kenneth Goff, Roy Frankhouser, James Madole, the KKK, George Wallacess wife. At the time of the interview his projects involve distribution of a 'White Power' button, working for Wallaces election, and finding activities and members for the Boston Citizens Council.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Fascist Union.
Citizens Council.
Ku Klux Klan (1915-)
White Power Movement.
Frankhauser, Roy Everett, Jr., 1939-2009.
Goff, Kenneth (Oliver Kenneth Goff), 1915-1972.
Antisemitism.
Right-wing extremists.
Christianity--United States.
Communism--United States.
Discrimination--United States.
Homosexuality--Societies, etc.
Homosexuality--United States.
Item 2: Speech. Boston chapter of the Citizens Councils of American, 3 April 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Rev. Richard Hamel has organized a meeting to gather members and support for the fledging Boston chapter of the Citizens Councils of American. Speaking to an audience of eleven his discourse covers: the unconstitutionality of the Civil Rights Acts, other right wings groups (KKK, John Birch Society, NAAWP), people and groups he opposes (Madalyn Murray O'Hair, W.E.B. DuBois, Gordon Hall, NAACP, CORE, Communists, Nat Hentoff) and his association with other leaders of conservative groups. He believes in "separate but equal," the intellectual superiority of the white race, and that the NAACP is controlled by the Communists. Hamel supports the separation of the races through biblical passages.
Subject/Index Terms:
Citizens' Councils of America.
Congress of Racial Equality.
John Birch Society.
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
National Association for the Advancement of White People.
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963.
Hall, Gordon D., 1921-2001.
Hicks, Louise Day, 1916-2003.
O'Hair, Madalyn Murray, 1919-1995.
Antisemitism.
Christianity and antisemitism.
Civil rights--United States.
Jews--Segregation.
Segregation--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Series 12: Civil RightsAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Hartman Turnbow, 1905-Add to your cart.
Biography: Hartman Turnbow was a farmer and civil rights advocate in Mississippi. He was one of a group of blacks who went to a courthouse to register to vote in Holmes County in 1963. The local sheriff, hostile to the group, asked who would be first to register. Hartman was the first to step forward. His house was subsequently firebombed, but he was later arrested for burning his own home. The charges were subsequently dismissed.
Item 1: Discussion on African-American voter registration, 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Hartman Turnbow, an Afro-American farmer in rural Mississippi, describes the persecution he suffered after attending literary classes and registering to vote.  A fire was set at Turnbow’s home.  The sheriff accused Turnbow of "keeping company with the wrong kind of people, these outside agitators" and arrested Turnbow for arson.  Of the eighty-eight African American who registered to vote in the county only three were allowed to vote because they failed to pass a literacy test.
Subject/Index Terms:
Civil rights movements.
African Americans--Segregation.
Blacks--Segregation.
Voter registration--United States.
Series 13: CommunismAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: M.S. Arnoni, 1922-1985.Add to your cart.
Biography:  M. S. Arnoni was a philosopher, writer, political activist, and professor of political science. He was also Jewish and had been imprisoned in multiple concentration camps during World War II.  Arnoni left the USA in 1969, after being a professor at various American universities, because of its intervention in Vietnam and his disappointment with the New Left.  Arnoni published several books and numerous articles on politics and other subjects.
Item 1: M.S. Arnoni interview, 3 June 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. M.S. Arnoni and Gordon Hall meet to discuss their views on a radio program on WTEM, Philadelphia, on June 3, 1964.
Sub-Series 2: Barry HoffmanAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Barry Hoffman interview, 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Interview by Philip Clark[e?], radio show The Big Lie: Communism in Action Today, "The Enemy Within," 1964.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-imperialist movements.
Communism and liberty.
Communism.
Communist strategy.
Freedom of speech--Cuba.
Series 14: Communist Party USAAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, 1890-1964.Add to your cart.
Biography: Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (1890-1964) became an advocate for socialism in her teens. She was also involved in labor movements such as the Industrial Workers of the World and their associated rallies and meetings, and her participation in these events frequently resulted in her being arrested. Flynn was an outspoken opponent of WWI and a founding member of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in 1920. She was forced out of the ACLU in 1940 for joining the Communist Party of the United States in 1936. Flynn was arrested in 1951 under the Smith Act which made it illegal to be any member of a group promoting the overthrow of the U. S. government; the act was used against members of organizations such as the Communist Party of the United States. Flynn served two years in prison. Upon release she resumed her work with Communist Party and became national chairperson in 1961. She died in 1964 in the Soviet Union on one of her visits there and was given a funeral attended by as many as 25,000 people on Red Square.
Item 1: Interview, Pacifica Radio. History and position of the Communist Party USA, 24 April 1961.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Elizabeth Gurley Flynn is the National Chairperson of the Communist Party USA, a primarily speaking position under the party’s political leadership by Gus Hall.  Flynn discusses the history of the party in the US and the difficulties and potential for intimidation from the government facing Communist Party members in the United States. The Party platform focuses on unemployment, racial equity, peace and socialism.  Finally she examines the strength of the Communist Party in Europe, esp. Britain, France and Italy.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Civil Liberties Union.
Hall, Gus.
Anti-communist.
Intimidation.
Propaganda.
Socialism.
Third parties (United States politics)
Communism--China.
Communism--Europe.
Communism--France.
Communism--Great Britain.
Communism--Italy.
Communism--Latin America.
Communism--Russia.
Sub-Series 2: Frank McGee, 1921-1974.Add to your cart.
Biography: Frank McGee began his career as a journalist working in his home town for WKY-TV. In 1955, the owners of WKY-TV bought WSFA-TV, an affiliate of NBC. Due to his coverage of the Civil Rights Movement, NBC offered him a position with the network and he went on to become "one of television's most prominent newsmen."
Item 1: Frank McGee interviewAdd to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  In part, Frank McGee reports on the Communist Party USA. Ken Wheeler, communist, and newspaper reporter is also accredited to Congress and The White House. Others communist party organizers and recruiters, professional revolutionaries are featured in this recording over a two-year period from 1971 to 1973. This NBC report reveals commentaries on the Communist Party of the United States, describing communist party members and chronological events. It also describes how the communist party may work and/or may be interpreted in the United States. There are expressed opinions and ideologies that communism should be prohibited almost anywhere. For instance, a nationwide pool by Opinions Research Corp., Princeton, NJ reveals the followings: 83% yes to prohibit communists to hold federal jobs or jobs in defense industries, 79% yes to bar communists to teach in public schools, 61% yes to outlaw the communist party, etc. In short, commentators say: "There is tolerance but we do not have acceptance."
Subject/Index Terms:
Bains, Jim.
Browder, Earl Russell, 1891-1973.
Brown, Archie, 1911-1990.
Ichord, Richard H., 1926-1992.
Winston, Henry, 1911-1986.
Civil rights and socialism.
Communism.
Labor unions and communism.
Sub-Series 3: Edward S. Teixeira, d. 2004.Add to your cart.
Biography: Edward S. Teixeira was the longtime organizer for the New England Communist Party. In 1972, he ran for the State House of Representatives in Ward 14 in Boston. At this time, the State Election Commission ruled that it was illegal to have the Communist Party on the ballot. Edward Teixeira successfully sued and was then able to place "Communist" beside his name on the ballot.
Item 1: Edward S. Teixeira interview, 14 April 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Edward S. Teixeira, a member of the Communist Party, discusses the activities of the party with an interviewer on the radio program Talk of the Town.
Subject/Index Terms:
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.
Marxian economics.
Communism--United States.
Series 15: ExtremismAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Bill Dennis, 1964-Add to your cart.
Item 1: Bill Dennis radio program, 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Spotlight Radio, hosted by Bill Dennis, was a series of short (3-4 minutes) radio programs highlighting extremists activities, focusing especially on groups allied with the John Birch Society.  These began to be aired in 1964. Sixteen segments are included in this collection.
Subject/Index Terms:
American opinion.
Anti-communist movements--United States.
Capitalism.
Censorship--United States.
Democracy.
DePugh, Robert B.
Freedom of speech--United States.
Hargis, Billy James, 1925-2004.
Independent America.
John Birch Society.
Manion, Clarence, 1896-1979.
Manion forum (Radio program)
McDowell, Joseph.
Minutemen (militia)
Mitchell, Jones Penn.
O'Brien, Dan.
Oliver, Revilo P. (Revilo Pendleton), 1908-1994.
Patriotism--United States.
Propaganda, American--History--20th century.
Right-wing extremists.
Smith, Hazel Brannon, 1914-1994.
Smoot, Dan (Howard Drummond Smoot), 1913-2003.
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Young Americans for Freedom (YAF)
Sub-Series 2: Medford Stanton Evans, 1934-Add to your cart.
Biography:  American journalist and author of eight books, including Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies (2007), M. Stanton Evans served as chairman of the American Conservative Union for most the 1970's. He was an accomplished leader in the conservative movement, the Young American for Freedom. Evans also trained many people in the art of journalism and as a consequence received several honors.
Item 1: Medford Stanton Evans interview, 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  M. Stanton Evans is interviewed about his (then) upcoming book The Usurpers. He stated that his book was about and for "The men who rule America--and appeal to those they rule."
Subject/Index Terms:
Activism.
Anti-communist movements.
Blacklisting of authors--United States.
Conservatism.
Conspiracy theories.
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978.
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963.
Kennedy, Robert F., 1928-1968.
Presidential candidates.
United States--Politics and government--1963-1969.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Warren, Earl, 1891-1974.
Sub-Series 3: Gordon D. Hall, 1921-2001.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Gordon D. Hall (1921-2001), a young veteran of the Pacific Theater during the Second World War, first encountered the printed propaganda issued by domestic hate-your-neighbor organizations/groups in the late 1940's. Based in Boston, he became a freelance investigator who spoke and presented his investigations and research of these organizations by giving public lectures about them. In the course of his lifetime, he collected massive amount of materials, e.g. newspapers, magazines, lectures, speeches, interviews, etc. which are now located in a handful of universities such as Brown, Brandeis and Illinois State University.
Item 1: A sketch of American political extremism, 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

May be accessed from any location.  Gordon Hall, a Bostonian and expert on extremist groups, spent his life studying, questioning, interviewing, exposing, lecturing and writing about extremist activity and philosophy in the United States. He was interested in left and right wing groups, groups spanning a wide political, social and religious spectrum active during the 1950s-1980s. Hall collected their literature, taped their speakers and traveled the country to lecture to civic, fraternal, university and political groups.

Hall begins his lecture with the basic philosophies of liberals and conservatives working within mainstream politics. Personally he adhered to a philosophy of mainstream politics, never stating is he prefers liberal or conservative ideals, where differences are debated and dealt with peacefully; even if it is a complex and messy system. He recognizes the proliferation of political parties, twenty-four at the time of his lecture. Part II Hall describes far left as outside the tradition of liberal reform, where disorderly and revolutionary change in the system is sought. He estimates there about 150 movements on the left with about one million members all with a Marxist leaning. He calls left extremists system haters and people lovers. Part III describes the far right as lovers of the american system as they see it, and haters of many people within it, specifically: Jews, Catholics, and non-whites. The over 1000 extremist groups, with 4-5,000,000 members on the right are usually single purpose movements, full of slogans and with little understanding of the broad issues. His favorite example of a right wing group is the John Birch Society. These groups use traditional symbolism (flag, constitution, religion, and family) to win members.

Subject/Index Terms:
Communism--United States.
Conservatism--United States.
John Birch Society.
Left-wing extremists.
Radicalism.
Right-wing extremists.
Liberalism--United States--20th century--History.
Item 2: Lecture.  Both sides of extremism, 1972.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Gordon Hall describes himself as an 'extreme watcher'. He watched, interviewed, wrote, and lectured about extremist groups for twenty-five years, full-time. Following the same outline as the speech on tape number five, he outlines what are liberals and conservatives in mainstream politics. He finds both sides of extremism offensive from the Black Panthers to the John Birch Society, holding special disdain for the 'know nothings' of many right wing groups.
Subject/Index Terms:
Churchill, Winston, 1874-1965.
Conservatism.
Dirksen, Everett McKinley.
Hoffman, Abbie.
John Birch Society.
Kissinger, Henry, 1923-
Left-wing extremists.
Liberalism--United States--20th century--History.
National Youth Alliance (U.S.)
Right-wing extremists.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Rousellot, John H.
Rubin, Jerry.
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Item 3: Gordon D. Hall interview, 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Gordon Hall, an expert on extremist groups, is interviewed by Haywood Vincent about the late Malcolm X. The interview covers issues dealing with his assassination, the Black Muslim Movement, and Gordon Hall and Malcom X’s personal relationship.
Subject/Index Terms:
Assassination.
Black Muslims.
Elijah Muhammad.
The Black Muslim Party.
X, Malcolm, 1925-1945.
Item 4: Gordon D. Hall interview, 24 January 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Gordon Hall and Palmer Payne discuss extremism and extremist groups on the radio program Boston forum, on January 24, 1966.
Item 5: Gordon D. Hall interview, fall 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Gordon Hall and Palmer Payne discuss extremist groups in the autumn of 1966, including problems of racism, civil rights, pacifist groups, and draft avoidance during the Vietnam conflict. Radio broadcast.
Subject/Index Terms:
African Americans--Civil rights.
Black power--United States.
Buckley, William F. (Frank), 1925-2008.
Communism--United States.
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963.
John Birch Society.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Item 6: Gordon D. Hall interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  The first in a series of programs entitled Discussions, in which Hall is interviewed about his work as a writer, and reporter on extreme right and left groups. Radio broadcast WGAN.
Subject/Index Terms:
Censorship.
Conservatism--United States.
Goldwater, Barry M. (Barry Morris), 1909-1998.
John Birch Society.
Liberalism--United States--20th century--History.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Item 7: Gordon D. Hall interview, 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Gordon Hall, lecturer and observer of extremist groups, answers call-in questions and calmly addresses tirades from radio listeners. Hall has followed extremist groups because he discovered "a few people in the right places can manipulate and control a large number [of people]."  Topics covered include: psychology of extremists, extremism compared to conservative and liberal movements, identifying extremists, pacifists, conspiracy theories, and symbolism in extremist groups.  Groups and/or individuals mentioned include:  John Birch Society, Now-Now, Carl McIntyre, Billy Hargis, Senator Bilbo, May 2nd Movement, KKK, Communists, and the magazine Minority of One.  Hall explains that extremists have lost faith in our democratic system and believe that they are the only ones who have the answers.  Two notable quotes from Hall: "those who fear are susceptible to the extremists" and many right wing extremists are "passionate lovers of America without any comprehension of what America is all about."
Item 8: Gordon D. Hall interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  WGBH Boston radio program WGBH Roundtable, "How dangerous are the extremists in the United States?"
Item 9: Gordon D. Hall interview, 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Radio interview, 1968.
Item 10: Speech on political extremism, 14 April 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Gordon Hall, a researcher on political extremism on both the political right and left, in the United States in the 20th century, discusses his research efforts and experiences. He describes interacting with individuals from the organizations and problems and harassment he has endured from them. Hall indicates that in his travels and presentations he has received feedback that has caused him to create this new presentation, which defines what extremism actually is and provides examples. Hall then defines extremism as well as the political center and discusses how each one operates. He includes numerous examples and personal annecdotes in his presentation before taking questions from the audience, including some from members of the extremist groups themselves.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-communist movements.
Black Panther Party.
Black power--United States.
Civil rights movements.
Communism--United States.
Conservatism--United States.
Far-left extremists.
Far-right extremists.
John Birch Society.
Liberalism--United States--20th century--History.
Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Item 11: Speech and panel discussion on political extremism, 2 March 1972.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Gordon Hall describes himself as an 'extreme watcher'. He watched, interviewed, wrote, and lectured about extremist groups for twenty-five years, full-time. Following the same outline as the speech on tape number five, he outlines what are liberals and conservatives in mainstream politics. He finds both sides of extremism offensive from the Black Panthers to the John Birch Society, holding special disdain for the 'know nothings' of many right wing groups.
Subject/Index Terms:
Black Panther Party.
Black power--United States.
College students--Political activity--History--20th century.
Far-left extremists.
Far-right extremists.
John Birch Society.
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994.
Rossiter, Clinton, 1917-1970.
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Item 12: Gordon D. Hall interview, 3 June 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Haywood Vincent interviews Gordon Hall on Vincent's radio program about his views on student left organizations. Hall answers charges made against him by some representatives of those organizations.
Subject/Index Terms:
Student movements--United States--History--20th century.
Sub-Series 4: Charles Rice, 1931-Add to your cart.
Biography:  Charles Rice is a Professor Emeritus in American legal studies at Notre Dame Law School.  Charles Rice aided the founding of the Conservative Party of New York in the 1960s and served as its Vice-Chairman from 1962-1969.  He currently lives with his wife in Mishawaka, Indiana.
Item 1: Charles Rice interview, 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  "Exploration of the radical right: their philosophy and what dangers they may pose" is a discussion, moderated by Ed Joyce of WCBS. Speakers are Charles E. Rice, associate professor of law at Fordham University School of Law and vice-chairman of the Conservative Party of New York and Gordon Hall, lecturer and writer on extremist groups.

The John Birch Society is the focus of their discussion.  Hall believes the Society is beyond conservative politics and exerts a dangerous influence over our politics. Rice does not consider the John Birch Society an extremist group and defends it as less of a threat to mainstream politics than the extreme left groups, especially the Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) one of whose founding members, Hubert Humphrey, is the vice-presidential candidate in the upcoming 1964 presidential election.

Subject/Index Terms:
Americans for Democratic Action (ADA)
Conservative Party of New York State.
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978.
John Birch Society.
Presidential candidates.
Right-wing extremists.
Sub-Series 5: James A. Rudin, 1934-Add to your cart.
Biography:  James Rudin is an American Rabbi and member of the American Jewish Committee. He is recognized for his work in inter-religious relations, particularly between Christians and Jews. A graduate of Wesleyan University, he has written for publications such as the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and News day for many years.
Item 1: Lecture on cult activity in the USA, 21 February 1979.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Lecture on cult activity in the USA. He spends a good deal of time on Jim Jones and his transplanted Peoples Temple (in which nearly 1000 Americans people committed mass suicide/were murdered in Guyana, South America).
Subject/Index Terms:
Brainwashing.
Cults--Uited States.
Extremism.
Intimidation.
Jones, Jim, 1931-1978.
Series 16: Far Left (Emergency Civil Liberties Committee)Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Clark Foreman, 1902-1977.Add to your cart.
Biography: Clark Foreman grew up in Georgia. His childhood and later travels in Europe led him to work for the Commission on Interracial Cooperation in Atlanta with Will Alexander. His work with the Phelps-Stokes and Julius Rosenwald Funds gave him the reputation of a Communist. Later, he supervised New Deal projects for the Department of the Interior, the state parks, the interdepartmental committee on Negro affairs, and the power division of the Public Works Authority. --From Oral Histories of the American South biography.
Item 1: Clark Foreman interview, 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Ed Joyce of WCBS moderates an often heated discussion about "What is the extreme left wing, how dangerous is it, and is there a resurgence of left wing organizations and activities?" with Dr. Clark Foreman and Gordon Hall.  Dr. Foreman, executive director of Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, worked in Roosevelt’s administration for the Works Progress Administration (WPA), defends the free speech of revolutionaries and communists of the "extreme left."  Gordon Hall, the moderator and interviewer of many interviews in this collection, Voices of Extremism, is a lecturer on extremist groups, sees any group that advocates change outside the tradition of liberal reform politics is an extremist group. Foreman defines extremism as undertaking violence to change the current system, all others ideologies should be free to speak their beliefs, including communists, Americans in Cuba, George Lincoln Rockwell, Paul Robeson, and the John Birch Society. He is against the government, especially the HUAC, compiling lists of subversive groups.  Hall defines left wing extremism as, "outside liberal reform tradition, outside the tradition of orderly and gradual change, rooted in radical, disorderly, revolutionary and disruptive change… [left wing extremism is] not the politics of moderation or alternatives, it is the politics of you are either with us or against us."
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee (U.S.)
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.
United States. Work Projects Administration.
Robeson, Paul.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Cuba.
Radicalism.
Series 17: FundamentalismAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Carl McIntire.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Dr. Carl McIntire was a Presbyterian who, in the 1930s, advocated the conservative side of the Fundamentalist-Modernist debate in the Presbyterian Church.  He was one of the founders of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church and a year later left to form the Bible Presbyterian Church which placed more emphasis on fundamentalism. McIntire began a radio program, “The Twentieth Century Reformation Hour” in 1955. He was very critical of liberalism in government, religion, and society, and was fiercely anti-Communist. He founded Shelton College in 1964, but the operation fell into trouble in the 1970s after internal strife and accreditation difficulties. His schools closed in the 1990s, his tax-exempt status was scrutinized, and he was forced out of the Bible Presbyterian Church. He died in 2002.
Item 1: Interview.  WNAC Comment Program, 18 May 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Dr. Carl McIntire, a minister of the Bible Presbyterian Church and radio personality, is interviewed by Fred Gale on Boston’s WNAC “Comment” program.  20th Century Reformation Hour, McIntire's thirty minute daily radio monologue was carried by nearly 600 stations at its peak in the mid-1960s.  As a proud conservative McIntire denounces the World Council of Churches, the infiltration of Catholics in our politics, communists in the United Nations, and government intervention in protecting civil rights.
Subject/Index Terms:
20th Century Reformation Hour.
International Council of Christian Churches.
John Birch Society.
Presbyterian Church.
Bunker, Laurence E., 1902-1977.
Hargis, Billy James, 1925-
Springer, Harvey H., 1907-1969.
Anti-communist movements.
Capitalism.
Discrimination.
Fundamentalism.
Fundamentalists.
Anti-Catholicism--United States.
Religion and politics--United States.
Segregation--United States.
Series 18: Illinois Communist PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Jack Kling, 1910-1990.Add to your cart.
Biography: Jack Kling (1911-1990) was co-chairman of the Illinois Communist Party, candidate for trustee of the University of Illinois, author of Where the Action is: Memoirs of a U.S. Communist and, and a forty-five year member of the Communist Party of the United States.
Item 1: Lecture. Communist Philosophy in a Changing World, 1 November 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  In this lecture Kling presents the ideal communist, economic philosophy, views socialism as the prelude to communism, and explains that every country approaches communism differently. He claims communist countries can have multiple political parties and its members have the right of dissent. Several brief topics of discussion include: Molotov's removal, free health care, punishment of anti-semitists in the U.S.S.R, education and areas of mutual agreement between communists and U.S. citizens. Questions follow the lecture.
Subject/Index Terms:
Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich, 1890-1986.
Antisemitism.
Civil rights and socialism.
Communism and philosophy.
Communism-Illinois.
Health care reform.
Communism--United States.
Communism--Illinois.
Series 19: John Birch SocietyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Laurence E. Bunker, 1902-1977.Add to your cart.
Biography: Colonel Laurence E. Bunker was a Boston lawyer and trustee. He was the chief aide to General Douglas MacArthur from April 1946 to November 1952 during the Japanese occupation and the Korean War. Colonel Bunker was one of the found­ing mem­bers of the John Birch Soci­ety.
Item 1: Laurence E. Bunker interview, June 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Col. Bunker, an original member of John Birch Society, addresses many questions about the Society posed by the host and call-in listeners. Topics are wide ranging and include The Politician and Blue Book, books by founder of the John Birch Society, Robert Welch; Democracy vs. Republic as forms of government, the latter he believes was the intention of the Founders; democracy equals mobocracy; Defends the John Birch Society as apolitical, classifies it is an educational society; Supports Welsh’s statement that former President Eisenhower is an "enemy and integral part of a group of gangsters determined to rule the world at any cost;" also that Eisenhower has always been sympathetic to communist goals and he willingly and consciously has been in the service of the communist conspiracy; Describes the purpose of the John Birch Society’s TACT (Truth About Civil Turmoil), created during the Civil Rights movement; Southern Christian Leadership Conference is a Communist organization; Strongly believe that Martin Luther King, Jr. is backed by members of communist fronts and King has attended leadership training to further the Communist agenda; States the Communist party influences 60-80% of Washington government; Implicates John Foster Dulles, Eisenhower, Henry Cabot Lodge, Truman and JFK in abetting the communists; Denounces Gordon Hall as a liar; Defends presidential candidate Governor Wallace and his position on civil rights, condones Strom Thurmond.
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
Truth About Civil Turmoil (Organization)
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Anti-communist movements.
Civil rights movements.
Civil rights.
Conservatism.
Subversive activities.
Sub-Series 2: Frank A. Capell.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Frank A. Capell (1908-1980), editor of The Herald of Freedom and anti-communist of freedom was also an essayist for the Christian Nationalist Crusade organization.
Item 1: Debate. Is the John Birch Society Good or Bad for America?, 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Gordon Hall argues that the John Birch Society (JBS) openly collaborates with hate groups, is racist, and is bad for America. Capell , author of bi-weekly paper "The Herald of Freedom" defends the JBS as a moderate group that is focusing on the infiltration of communism and the subversion of the United States, fighting for freedom. Hall cites passages by Robert Welch from John Birch Society publications, and challenges Capell to defend the statements. Topics covered include: Eisenhower and Dulles as abetting Communism, Billy Hargis as racist, challenges to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, fear of a Negro-soviet Republic lead by Martin Luther King, affiliations with the FBI, and endless discussion of a California Senate fact finding committee on un-American activities that refutes allegations against the John Birch Society. In response Hall quotes Attorney General Robert Kennedy as saying, The John Birch Society is aiding and abetting the communist conspiracy through campaigns of irresponsible and inaccurate and dogmatic charges against our government officials. The moderator Red Benson is continually reminding the debaters to stay on topic.
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation
Hargis, Billy James, 1925-
Kennedy, Robert F., 1928-1968.
Racism.
Sub-Series 3: John P. H. Chandler, Jr., 1911-2011.Add to your cart.
Biography:  John Chandler Jr. (1911-2001) also known as John P. H. Chandler, Jr. was a Republican member of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives in 1943 and a member of New Hampshire Governor's Council 5th District from 1953-1959. In 1961, he became a New Hampshire State Senator.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Conservative Union.
American Flag Committee.
Americans for Constitutional Action (Organization)
John Birch Society.
Liberty Amendment Committee of the U.S.A.
Item 1: Interview. New England God, Family, and Country Rally, June 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  State Senator John Chandler Jr. , a conservative of New Hampshire, discusses his career and views in this interview with Gordon Hall in June 1969 at the God Family and Country Rally. Senator Chandler , a member of over 100 organizations explains his affiliation with several conservative groups: New England Rally for God, Family and Country (which some considered a front for the John Birch Society), the Liberty Amendment, Americans for Constitutional Action, the New Hampshire Conservative Union, and the American Flag Committee. He also explains his controversial gun bill to require all males in the state to own a gun and 500 rounds of ammunition.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Conservative Union.
American Flag Committee.
Americans for Constitutional Action (Organization)
John Birch Society.
Liberty Amendment Committee of the U.S.A.
Communism--United States.
Conservatism--United States.
Constitutional Amendment--United States.
Liberalism--United States--20th century--History.
Sub-Series 4: Thomas J. Davis.Add to your cart.
Item 1: Thomas J. Davis interview, 3 May 1966.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Thomas J. Davis, Eastern Director of Public Relations for the John Birch Society, describes and defends the Society and its publications in a contentious WJAR radio interview by Bob Cain on May 3, 1966. He refutes that the John Birch Society is an extremist organization, denies it is a secret society, expresses his hate of Gordon Hall, and condones John Birch Society's founder, Robert Welch’s accusations that JFK was a traitor. Interview is followed by telephone questions from listeners.
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
Anti-communist movements.
Anti-globalization movement.
Civil rights movements.
Conservatism.
Right of property.
Sub-Series 5: Lola Belle Holmes, 1912-Add to your cart.
Biography:  Lola Belle Holmes was an African-American who identified herself as a former undercover agent for the FBI within the Communist Party.
Item 1: Interview. Lola Belle Holmes, speaker, undercover, and controversies, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Lola Belle Holmes interviewed in regards to a number of controversial issues of the time and her involvement in them. The John Birch Society, The Communist Party, racial equality/empowerment, and the FBI all play some kind of role.
Subject/Index Terms:
Carmichael, Stokely.
Cleaver, Eldridge, 1935-1998.
Hall, Gordon D.
Rosenberg, Julius, 1918-1953.
Accomplices.
Affiliaton (Philosophy)
Civil rights movements.
Conservatism.
Federal government.
Informers.
Sub-Series 6: John McManus, 1935-Add to your cart.
Biography:  John McManus left the field of electronics engineering in 1966 to work full-time for the John Birch Society.  He has been the President of the John Birch Society since 1991, and as of 2014 resided in Wakefield, Massachusetts.
Item 1: John McManus interview, 5 April 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  John McManus, a staff member of the John Birch Society, describes the Society and its work in this interview on the WTAG radio program Talk of the Town.
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Anti-communist.
Communism.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Sub-Series 7: Revilo Pendleton Oliver, 1910-1994.Add to your cart.
Revilo P. Oliver was a scholar of international distinction and an advocate of conservatism in the United States in the early 1950s. Oliver co-founded the anti-communist John Birch Society for which he frequently wrote articles appearing in the magazine American Opinion. However, Oliver became disillusioned as he discovered "Jewish subversion" of the John Birch society founded by Robert Welch, and eventually Oliver become an "avowed racial nationalist."  In 1981, he published America’s Decline: The Education of a Conservative to narrate his discovery.
Item 1: Speech. Congress of Freedom, Washington D.C., undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  In a speech before the Congress of Freedom, in Washington, D.C., professor Oliver discusses the smear campaign against the John Birch Society which he feels is being run by the communists in the United States.
Subject/Index Terms:
Fabian Society (Great Britain)
Industrial Workers of the World.
John Birch Society.
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
Radio Free Europe.
UNICEF.
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.
Barron, Bryton, b. 1898.
Budenz, Louis F. (Louis Francis), 1891-1972.
Castro, Fidel, 1926-
Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.
Foster, William Z., 1881-1961.
Frankfurter, Felix, 1882-1965.
Fulton, Lewis, 1903-1966.
Goff, Kenneth (Oliver Kenneth Goff), 1915-1972.
Marks, Herman.
Marx, Karl, 1818-1893.
McCarthy, Joseph, 1908-1957.
Philbrick, Herbert Arthur, 1915-1993.
Rougemont, Denis de, 1906-1985.
Rusher, William A., 1923-2011.
Taber, Robert.
Walter, Francis E. (Francis Eugene), 1894-1963.
Welch, Robert, 1899-1985.
Anti-communist movements.
History.
Communist China.
Conspiracy.
Fabian ideas.
Keynesian economics.
National service.
Socialism.
Taxation.
Welfare economics.
Communism--China--History.
Communism--Cuba.
Public welfare--United States.
Sub-Series 8: John Harbin Rousselot, 1927-2003.Add to your cart.
Biography:  After graduating from college, John Rousselot (1927-2003) worked in a variety of business positions before turning to politics in the late 1950s. After working for the Federal Housing Administration for several years, Rousselot sucessfully ran for Congress in 1961 but failed to win re-election in 1963. Rousselot was an active and leading member of the John Birch Society, a relationship that grew when he left Congress. Referred to as the No. 2 Bircher, Rousselot was reported to be the sucessor to the societys leader, Robert Welch, and functioned as spokesman for the society. Rousselot stepped down from his leadership role with the society in 1967 but remained a member, making statements that he felt he wasnt achieving enough for the society to remain in his official post. Rousselot resigned from the John Birch Society completely in 1979. Rousselot ran for election to Congress once again in 1970, won, and continued to be re-elected through January of 1983, after which he served as special assistant to President Reagan. Afterwards he served as president of the National Council of Savings Institutions from 1985-1988, and made a final run for Congress in 1992, but did not succeed. Rousselot died of heart failure May 11, 2003.
Item 1: Speech, Pacifica Radio. Rally on Anti-Communism, 11 November 1961.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  John Rousselot, a member of the U.S. House of representatives from 1961-1963 and 1970-1983 was also a member of the John Birch Society and its public relations director. His speech at a rally in 1961 defends maintaining a strong anti-communist movement in the United States. He bemoans governments complicity in abandoning anti-communist activities that he believes are effective: the government banned film Operation Abolition and limited anti-communist teaching in the military.
Subject/Index Terms:
Fabian Society (Great Britain)
John Birch Society.
Anti-communist movements.
Fabian ideas.
McCarthyism.
New Right.
Arts--Censorship.
Sub-Series 9: Herbert W. Thole, 1906-1987.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Herbert Thole was a member of the John Birch Society. He joined the organization after working on Barry Goldwater's campaign. Thole saw the media and United States government as pro-Communist. He believed that Communists intended to dominate the world and that anyone short of being extremely anti-Communist was by default a Communist sympathizer.
Item 1: Interview. Discussion about Communism, Vietnam, and the John Birch Society, 21 June 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Mr. Thole, a member of the John Birch Society, discusses his views of communism, the war in Vietnam, events of the time and the John Birch Society, in an interview on June 21, 1967.
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
Anti-communist movements.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
African Americans--Civil rights.
Communism--United States.
Sub-Series 10: Robert Welch, 1899-1985.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Robert Welch became independently wealthy following his retirement and used his wealth to promote anti-communist causes.  He founded the John Birch Society (JBS) in 1958, a "political advocacy group that supports anti-communism, limited government, a Constitutional Republic, and personal freedom."  The John Birch Society is often considered to be analogous with right-wing extremism.
Item 1: Robert Welch interview, 20 November 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Welch states that there is a conspiracy, with approximately 30 individuals in the inner circle, to take over the world and put it under one government, possibly the United Nations. Everything from Arab-Israeli Wars (started to strengthen the United Nations and establish their peacekeeping force) to 1970s inflation and shortages (done to bring damage to the power of the United States) are carefully scripted by the leaders of the conspiracy, who are "calling the shots" from New York or Washington. Welch states that he does not know who many of the leaders of the inner circle are. They are a diverse group of politicians, bankers, businessmen, and others. Individuals believed to be part of the upper levels of the conspiracy are John D. Rockefeller and Robert McNamara. The Soviet Union leaders are not leading members of the inner circle and take orders from the conspiracy leaders. Welch believes that President Nixon was a member of the consipiracy and rose to power in part because of them, but subsequently became too powerful and deviated from the wishes of the consipiracy, the leadership of which subsequently fabricated the Watergate scandal to bring him down.
Subject/Index Terms:
John Birch Society.
Anti-globalization movement.
Communist strategy.
Conspiracy theories.
Series 20: Ku Klux Klan (1915-)Add to your cart.
Series 1: Charles Arlington, 1965.Add to your cart.
Biography: Charles Arlington was KLAC radio special projects director when this broadcast took place.
Item 1: Charles Arlington radio presentation, "Hotbed of Hatred: A Study of the California Klan", 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Speakers include Reverend Wesley Swift of the Christian Defense League; Richard Girnt Butler, a close disciple of Swift and founder of the Aryan Nations; Reverend William P. Gale, leader of the Christian Defense League (CDL); G. Clinton Wheat of Los Angeles, who has been identified as an ex-Klansman that hosted meetings at his house of the Church of Jesus Christ-Christian, the Christian Defense League and the American Nazi Party; Thomas C. Lynch, District Attorney in San Francisco and then Attorney-General of California from 1964 to 1971; a secret informer, agent 13551, speaking on 10 June 1964 (the date of the death of George Lincoln Rockwell); Norman Britton, county chairman from San Bernardino, California; Edward R. Fields, active in the nascent neo-Nazi movement while a teenager in Atlanta; William H. Garland.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-Semitism.
Christianity and antisemitism.
Civil rights.
Radicalism.
African Americans--Civil rights.
Discrimination--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Series 2: Elizabeth Marcia Tompkins and Robert CreelAdd to your cart.
Biography: Robert Creel (1876-1953) was the Grand Dragon of Alabama for the Ku Klux Klan in the early 1960s. He participated in numerous KKK rallies and activities as well as openly supported the KKK members accused of murdering a civil rights worker. He quit his full time job to devote his time to the KKK, and was a top aide of Robert Shelton, the KKK’s Imperial Wizard, for two years. Creel insisted that the KKK was not an organization of hate. He stepped down from his position in late 1965. Creel stated that an investigation by a House Committee influenced his decision to resign. Elizabeth Marcia Tompkins clandestinely recorded the meeting and provided narrative.
Item 1: Meeting, KKK, 'Be it Ever so Humble'. Pacifica Radio, 1 September 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Clandestinely taped by a non-KKK citizen of Tuscaloosa, Elizabeth Marcia Tompkins provides narrative for the KKK meeting and cross burning, held at the county fairgrounds under a Confederate flag. Robert (Bob) Creel, Grand Dragon of Alabama, speaks of the need to fight against communism and socialism while he explains that the KKK is not an organization of hate. The second speaker laments religion being driven from schools and the loss of the dreams of the Founding Fathers (dream includes segregation), upholds the virtues of Senator McCarthy and Governor George Wallace, urges the audience to join another conservative group such as the John Birch Society or Christian Crusade, and believes the Klan and its members duty is to fight the liberal movement.
Subject/Index Terms:
Creel, George, 1876-1953.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Anti-communist movements.
Christianity and antisemitism.
African Americans--Civil rights.
Civil rights--United States.
Discrimination--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Series 21: Labor UnionsAdd to your cart.
Series 1: Eugene Victor Debs, 1855-1926.Add to your cart.
Biography: Eugene Debs (1855-1926) was a labor organizer in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His initial efforts involved encouraging positive relationships between workers and employers to seek mutually beneficial outcomes. This worked for a time for Debs. Later, however, when he did not see employers willing to discuss, much less accommodate, worker needs, he advocated increasingly confrontational tactics up to and including large-scale strikes. This culminated in the Pullman Strike of 1894 which led to his arrest after President Cleveland sent in federal troops to break up the strike. After emerging from prison, Debs began advocating socialism and continued to work extensively with labor unions such as the Industrial Workers of the World and American Federation of Labor. He vehemently opposed American involvement in WWI and was arrested in 1918 after a speech advocating resistance to the military draft. He ran for President while serving his prison sentence. After being released early he lived quietly as the socialist political movement faded.
Item 1: Documentary on Eugene Victor Debs, Pacifica Radio, November 1962.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Compilation of eloquent snippets from Debs speeches interspersed with biography and commentary by Harold Hamilton of the Debs Foundation and Debs contemporary, fellow socialist James ONeil. Early railroad organizer, Debs founded the American Railway Union in 1893 and went to jail for his part in the Pullman Strike. Known as a great orator, Debs became a politician, ran for president five times for the Socialist Party, ran for Congress from Indiana and was imprisoned for his out-spoken opposition to World War I.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Railway Union.
Eugene V. Debs Foundation.
Pullman Strike, 1894.
United Brotherhood of Railway Employees.
O'Neil, James.
Labor leaders.
Socialism.
Industrial organizations--United States.
Labor unions--Organizing.
Series 22: May 2nd MovementAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Antonio Camejo, Bob Doyle, Gus Horowitz, and William (Bill) SacksAdd to your cart.
Biography: In 1969 and through the first half of 1970, Gus Horowitz was the national anti-war director of the United States Socialist Workers' Party (SWP). On Labor Day weekend in 1969, in New York, the Socialist Workers Party held its national convention. Horowitz had initiated the discussion on a resolution assessing developments within the movement against the Vietnam War and the role of the SWP within that movement. The May 2nd movement was formed to fight and revolt against the politics at the time that the government led in the war in Vietnam. The first major student demonstrations against the war in Vietnam took place on May 2, 1964. Students demonstrated in Time Square, in New York City against US intervention in South Vietnam. Students and young people also demonstrated in San Francisco, Madison, Seattle, and elsewhere throughout the U.S. Demonstrations were to denounce the lies of a government of socially creative forces, a military machine that enforced violence, and ultimately, its imperialistic conduct. Bob Doyle was an independent student who sympathizes with student demonstrating groups. Bill Sacks was a May 2nd Movement member.
Item 1: Antonio Camejo, Bob Doyle, Gus Horowitz, and William (Bill) Sacks interview, 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Gus Horowitz and Tony Camejo speak about the Young Socialist Alliance, a Trotskyist group of the the 1960’s in the United States. Horowitz and Cameyo’s philosophy of socialism comes from Marx’s socialism, Trotsky, and in the tradition of Engels and Lenin, extending to Eugene Debs. They are commenting on different aspects of the Young Socialist Alliance, including young students and workers involvement in terms of unemployment issues, problems of war, racism, and fascism in the United States. Bill Sacks speaks on the May 2nd movement. Bob Doyle is an independent student who sympathizes with student demonstrating groups.
Subject/Index Terms:
May 2nd Movement.
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926.
Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Anti-racism.
Political activists.
Race discrimination.
Unemployment.
Student movements--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Gus Horowitz and Bill Sacks.Add to your cart.
Biography: In 1969 and through the first half of 1970, Gus Horowitz was the national anti-war director of the United States Socialist Workers' Party (SWP). On Labor Day weekend in 1969, in New York, the Socialist Workers Party held its national convention. Horowitz had initiated the discussion on a resolution assessing developments within the movement against the Vietnam War and the role of the SWP within that movement. Bill Sacks was a May 2nd Movement member.
Item 1: Gus Horowitz and Bill Sacks interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Young Socialists Alliance members (Horowitz and others) and May 2nd Movement member Bill Sacks answer questions on a radio call-in show.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-imperialist movements.
Anti-racism.
Political activists.
Race discrimination.
Unemployment.
Student movements--United States.
Sub-Series 3: Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer.Add to your cart.
Biography: Judith White and Steve Chase were members of the Young Socialist Alliance, Cynthia Wegman was a member of the Students for a Democratic Society, and John Mayer was a member of the May 2nd Movement.
Item 1: Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer interview, 27 May 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Haywood Vincent radio broadcast in which Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer debate with Gordon Hall.
Subject/Index Terms:
Communism.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Student movements--United States.
Series 23: McCarthy EraAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Carey McWilliams, 1905-1980.Add to your cart.
Biography: Carey McWilliams (1905-1980) was an attorney from 1927-1938 in Los Angeles specializing in labor law and it was during this time that he became deeply concerned with the issue of racism, especially prejudice against Mexican immigrants and Japanese Americans. He wrote many books on this topic and a few notable books include: A Mask for Privilege: Anti-Semitism in America (1948), Brothers Under the Skin (1943), Prejudice: Japanese Americans, Symbol of Racial Intolerance, and Factories in the Fields: The Story of Migratory Farm Labor in California (1939). Around 1945, Carey became associated with The Nation publication. He successfully moved up the ranks starting as contributing editor to eventually become the editor of The Nation from 1955-1975. During this time he continued to lecture and write many books and publications on various topics. After he retired from The Nation in 1975, Carey continued to write a column in The Nation magazine.
Item 1: Speech, Pacifica Radio, 'Vile Decade of the 1950s', 24 June 1960.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Carey McWilliams, editor of The Nation magazine, addresses the members of the ACLU in Marin County, California. In his speech entitled Vile Decade of the 1950s he describes the lasting negative effects of McCarthyism, what needs to be done to prevent another 'demigod' from creating a similar atmosphere of terror leading to repression of our civil liberties and influencing our foreign policies. McWilliams applauds the individuals and groups that continued to fight for our liberties during the Vile Decade of the 1950s.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Civil Liberties Union.
McCarthy, Joseph, 1908-1957.
McCarthyism.
Political campaigns.
Presidential candidates.
Civil rights--United States.
Nuclear weapons--Psychological aspects.
Sub-Series 2: Reuben Ship, 1917-1975 and John Drainie, 1916-1966.Add to your cart.
Biography: John Drainie (1916-1966) was called "the greatest radio actor in the world" by Orson Welles. A Canadian actor and television presenter, Drainie began his radio career in Vancouver. He was famous for the radio adaptation of W.O. Mitchell's Jake and the Kid and a popular one-man stage show. In 1954 he voiced an "extraordinarily lifelike imitation" in the satirical radio play The Investigator, written by Reuben Ship. Reuben Ship (1917-1975) was a Canadian playwright and screenwriter. He first settled in New York working for NBC. While in California, he became under suspicion for being a communist, likely because of accusations by two fellow members of the Radio Writers' Guild. He was summoned to appear before the Un-American Activities Committee, at which he "was labeled an uncooperative witness" and was deported in 1953.
Item 1: Satirical Radio Play, Pacifica Radio. 'The Investigation', 11 April 1962.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. This radio play features a McCarthy-like senator who dies in a plane crash. Arriving at the gates of heaven, he begins to launch investigations into various well-known individuals believing that they are agents of a foreign power: Satan. His movement gains momentum and many prominent historical figures are sent down there. Eventually he goes too far and attempts to put "the chief" (God) on trial as well.
Subject/Index Terms:
McCarthy, Joseph, 1908-1957.
Conspiracy theories.
Deportation.
Freedom of speech.
McCarthyism.
Political satire.
Subversive activities.
Series 24: MuckrakingAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Upton Sinclair, 1878-1968.Add to your cart.
Biography: Upton Sinclair was a well known novelist, politician, and muckracker during the 20th century. He wrote over 90 books, many of which made some kind of impact on changing America.
Item 1: Speech, Pacifica Radio. 'Changing America', 1962.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Upton Sinclair was a well known novelist, politician, and muckracker during the 20th century. He wrote over 90 books, many of which made some kind of impact on changing America. In this lecture, given in 1961 at Pomona College, he talks about three specific cases where he was able to change America: the publishing of The Jungle, the publishing of the Flivver King, and his campaign for Governor of California.
Subject/Index Terms:
Ford, Henry, 1863-1947.
Social problems.
Socialism.
Political participation--United States.
Series 25: National Christian PublishersAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Oren Petito, 1931-1995.Add to your cart.
Biography: Potito, Oren, 1931-1995, born in Boston, MA was an early Christian Identity minister, associated with the the Church of Jesus Christ Christian, Wesley A. Swif thad founded. Potito published the National Christian News and his group was called National Christian Publishers.
Item 1: Speech. Reverend Potito Begins His Survival Tape Series, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. An undated address in St. Petersburg, FL, Reverend Potito begins his survival tape series.
Subject/Index Terms:
Halsted, Walter.
Washington, George, 1732-1799.
Antisemitism.
Christianity and antisemitism.
Conspiracy theories.
Fear.
Survivalism.
World War III.
Anti-communist movements--United States.
Series 26: National Renaissance PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Richard Baer, James Madole, and James WagnerAdd to your cart.
Biography: James H. Madole (1927-1979) founded the National Renaissance Party in 1949. The movement received little attention until the House of Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) investigated Madole and the National Renaissance Party in 1954. The party believed that the governing force of the U.S. should be a trained elite body rather than a parliamentary government. They felt that racial pride and the preservation of the "white Aryan" race were important ideals, and advocated the deportation of non-Caucasian races. They also felt that the Jewish people should be denied citizenship, and likewise professional and political positions. While they claimed that the NRP was an "antidote" to communism, HUAC stated that they equated "Jew" and "Communist." James Wagner was a former Security Echelon (SE) commander. He thought that the NRP and the Church of Satan, founded by Anton Szandor LaVey coincided. References to James Wagner are made in the book by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke, 'The Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity.'
Item 1: National Renaissance Party Rally, 22 March 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Several speeches plus sporatic heckling from a National Renaissance Party (NRP) rally in March, 1968 in New York City. Madole first explains why several members were thrown-out of the NRP and reads a letter from the National Socialist White Party support in cooperation among the two groups. James Wagner stakes a strong anti-Jew position. Richard Bear explains how the Hebrews are gone and today's Jews are descendants of Cossars and incapable of sustaining a civilization. Finally, Madole returns to denounce the war in Asia. Finally Madole returns to denounce the war in Asia, Blacks, William F. Buckley, the lack of discipline and praises Gov. Wallace, a totalitarianism take over of the government, and division of the races.
Subject/Index Terms:
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.
Buckley, William F. (Frank), 1925-2008.
Guevara, Ernesto, 1928-1967.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Security Echelon.
Race discsrimination--United States.
Segregation--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Richard Bayer.Add to your cart.
Biography: Richard Bayer was born in Jamaica. Anti-Jewish and segregationist, he met John H. Madole in 1967 and joined the National Renaissance Party.
Item 1: Interview. Reasons for joining the National Renaissance Party, 16 June 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Richard Bayer calmly discusses with Gordon Hall his reasons for joining the National Renaissance Party (NRP) which include his disillusionment with the current government and with Christianity. He outlines his attitude towards Negros, he defines anti-Semitism vs. anti-Jews (he is the latter), explains the necessary use of violence, denies the holocaust, and interestingly champions his beliefs that a major tenet of the NRP would be a free educational program that would apply to all people who have proven academically able to continue in their education, similar to systems in practice in Europe, communist China, Latin America, and Mexico. Bayer believes that 'education is the source of any society'. Meanwhile he also asserts that the rise of his party will need to include a weeding out of undesirables, this country has allowed in excessive materialism, political corruption, excessive "churchianity," complete ruthless Jewish control, underworld activities, a general weakening and breaking down of moral, spiritual, physical and mental fiber of our nation's youth.
Subject/Index Terms:
Madole, James Hartung, 1927-1979.
Anti-Jewish propaganda.
Holocaust denial.
African Americans--Segregation.
Fascism--United States.
Jews--Segregation.
Political campaigns.
Sub-Series 3: James H. Madole, 1927-1979.Add to your cart.
Biography: James H. Madole (1927-1979) founded the National Renaissance Party in 1949. The movement received little attention until the House of Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) investigated Madole and the National Renaissance Party in 1954. The party believed that the governing force of the U.S. should be a trained elite body rather than a parliamentary government.  They felt that racial pride and the preservation of the "white Aryan" race were important ideals, and advocated the deportation of non-Caucasian races. They also felt that the Jewish people should be denied citizenship, and likewise professional and political positions. While they claimed that the NRP was an "antidote" to communism, HUAC stated that they equated "Jew" and "Communist."
Item 1: Interview. Opinion of the National Renaissance Party, 3 August 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  An interview by Gordon Hall where John Madole presents his logistics and philosophy of the National Renaissance Party (NRP).
Subject/Index Terms:
American Civil Liberties Union.
American Nazi Party.
National States Rights Party (U.S.)
LaVey, Anton Szandor, 1930-1997.
Antisemitism.
Censorship.
Right-wing extremists.
Security Echelon.
Socialism.
Totalitarianism.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Item 2: Speech. Convention of the Association of Racist Movements, 18 April 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Amid continual heckling, are opening speeches at the three-day, seemingly sparsely attended, Convention of the Association of Racist Movements on April 18, 1969 in New York City, sponsored by the National Renaissance Party (NRP). Madole, head of the NRP claims Jews are responsible for drugs and pornography in the U.S., destroy every country they live in, control the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), are incapable of art or building a culture, control our politics and media, and are the cause of our failing educational system. Jew are a breed of aliens that deserve to be destroyed. The second speaker, Roy Frankhouser, a KKK member predicts a violent civil war between the black and white militants in the U.S. as he urges everyone to leave the middle and join the fight to save the white race. After interacting with the hecklers, his final comment was: "We got a couple of good niggers in Reading, PA. We got three of them this year, the Klan took care of one and the police took care of the other two."
Subject/Index Terms:
Ku Klux Klan (1915-)
National Renaissance Party.
National Socialist White People's Party.
Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
Frankhauser, Roy Everett, Jr., 1939-2009.
Antisemitism.
Judgment (Ethics)
Nazi propaganda.
Security Echelon.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Black power--United States.
Organizational behavior--Moral and ethical aspects.
Race discsrimination--United States.
Racism--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Sub-Series 4: James H. Madole, 1927-1979 and James Wagner, 1947-Add to your cart.
Biography: James H. Madole (1927-1979) founded the National Renaissance Party in 1949. The movement received little attention until the House of Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) investigated Madole and the National Renaissance Party in 1954. The party believed that the governing force of the U.S. should be a trained elite body rather than a parliamentary government.  They felt that racial pride and the preservation of the "white Aryan" race were important ideals, and advocated the deportation of non-Caucasian races. They also felt that the Jewish people should be denied citizenship, and likewise professional and political positions. While they claimed that the NRP was an "antidote" to communism, HUAC stated that they equated "Jew" and "Communist." James Wagner was a former Security Echelon (SE) commander. He thought that the NRP and the Church of Satan, founded by Anton Szandor LaVey coincided. References to James Wagner are made in the book by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke, 'The Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity'.
Item 1: National Renaissance Party Rally, 26 April 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. This rally of the National Renaissance Party (NRP) features several speakers, including party founder James Madole and James Wagner. The party doctrine advocates racial segregation and “taking back” America for whites. Members of other races are to be deported to their respective “homelands” and no ill will is directed toward them. Party doctrine principles are read. Jews, however, as seen as evil and the source of all the world’s problems, past and present. Party doctrine links them to every failed republic. Jews are also responsible for inciting the blacks to riot. Party members are encouraged to counter-march "Communist Liberal Jews." Speakers state that the party has no desire to treat Jews as Nazi Germany did (the party also denies the scope of the Holocaust, claiming that the pictures of bodies widely publicized were in fact civilian victims of bombing raids). When heckled by self-identified Jews in the audience the speakers become immediately incensed and scream about wiping Jews out and using phrases such as "The only good Jew is a dead Jew!"
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968.
Warner, James K.
Anti-communist movements.
Antisemitism.
Communism.
Judgment (Ethics)
Refoulement.
Jews--Segregation.
African Americans--Segregation.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Sub-Series 5: Louis MostaccioAdd to your cart.
Biography: Louis Mostaccio (1926-2011) was a member of the National Renaissance Party, a neo-Nazi group. He is best known for his arrest during a rally in New York City wherein protesters rushed the speaker and Mostaccio, the flag bearer in Nazi regalia, attacked a police officer with the flagstaff. He claimed he did not know the man was a police officer but was found guilty of assault.
Item 1: Interview. Objectives and beliefs of the party, 16 June 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Louis Mostaccio was a member of the Neo-Nazi National Renaissance Party. In this interview with Gordon Hall, Mostaccio discusses the aims, actions, and beliefs of the party.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
Madole, James Hartung, 1927-1979.
Judaism.
Sub-Series 6: John RyanAdd to your cart.
Biography: John Ryan was a truck driver and a member of the National Renaissance Party and had previously been a member of the American Nazi Party. Ryan found the American Nazi party and its leader George Lincoln Rockwell lacking and not in strict adherence to Hitler Nazism, and believed that the National Renaissance Party was a superior organization.
Item 1: Interview. A typical member of the National Renaissance Party, 15 June 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Gordon Hall interviews a typical member of the National Renaissance Party: single, young, male, no high school diploma, and frequently unemployed. The interview covers a wide range of subjects: security, hecklers, difficulties in running public meetings, anti-Semitism, civil rights activism, other right wing organizations, holocaust denial, white supremacy, sending blacks to Africa, Gov. George Wallace, need to preserve racial heritage, and how a totalitarianism state lead by a white supremacy group will lead to world peace.
Subject/Index Terms:
National Renaissance Party.
Madole, James Hartung, 1927-1979.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Antisemitism.
Right-wing extremists.
Totalitarianism.
African Americans--Segregation.
Blacks--Relocation.
National Socialism--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Sub-Series 7: Henry von SiennoAdd to your cart.
Biography: Henry von Sienno (aka von Potworowski),  born in Poland, emigrated to the United States in 1946. He graduated from Princeton with a degree in chemistry and was called the 'resident philosopher' of Madole’s National Renaissance Party.
Item 1: Interview. A vision of a National Socialist society, 15 June 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Henry von Sienno carefully examines the differences between the National Renaissance Party and Rockwell's American Nazi Party. He states that 'this country [United States] has not, as yet, developed a really rational right wing group or party, they are mostly amateurs at it.' each group looking at only one conservative aspect, namely religion, economics, narrow-minded race, or foreign heroes all with no political horizon. The interview concludes with von Sienno's vision of a National Socialist society which puts the good of the whole society above the individual, where political parties and elections do not exist, where the best minds are running the country, society functions as an organic whole, and fascism becomes a way of life.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Nazi Party.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Conservatism--United States.
Fascism--United States.
National Socialism--United States.
Sub-Series 8: James Wagner, 1947-Add to your cart.
Biography: James Wagner was a former Security Echelon (SE) commander. He thought that the NRP and the Church of Satan, founded by Anton Szandor LaVey coincided. References to James Wagner are made in the book by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke, 'The Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity'.
Item 1: Interview, 27 April 1968.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Gordon Hall conducts a leisurely chat with James Wagner a twenty-one year old thoughtful and committed member of the National Renaissance Party (NRP). Wagner strongly opposes democracy and individual freedom, wants blacks segregation from the white race, and is convinced the Jews (who are communists) and liberals are the worst enemy leading to the decline of the U.S. They discuss Wagner's activity with the NRP, his dislike of hippies, peace demonstrators, and the need to strip Jews of U.S. citizenship. Wagner also predicts that the summer of 1968 will be filled with riots in the cities and Harlem will explode with unrest.
Subject/Index Terms:
Madole, James Hartung, 1927-1979.
Antisemitism.
Security Echelon.
Anti-communist movements--United States.
Blacks--Segregation.
Jews--Segregation.
Item 2: Interview, 15 February 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Hall again interviews James Wagner, a committed National Renaissance Party (NRP) member in 1968, who is now a far left revolutionary socialist. They discuss Wagner's life in the NRP, especially gathering information about the NRP leader James Madole. Wagner explains his reasons for leaving the party, his readings leading to his new philosophy, and the various socialist and communist groups in the U.S. Finally they discuss if and how the radical left wing groups and picketers accept Wagner.
Subject/Index Terms:
Revolutionary Communist Youth Brigade (U.S.)
Madole, James Hartung, 1927-1979.
Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940.
Anti-war demonstrations.
Permanent revolution theory.
Security Echelon.
United States.
Communism--United States.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest Movements--United States.
Series 27: National Socialist PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Collin, Frank Joseph, 1944-Add to your cart.
Biography: Born November 3, 1944, Frank Joseph Collin was a Chicago native and member of the National-Socialist White People’s Party in the 1960s. After Rockwell’s assassination in 1967, Collin’s disagreement with the new party head, Matt Koehl, led him to leave the party, and found his own, the National Socialist Party of America. The National Socialist Party of America received little attention until 1977, when the group declared their intention to demonstrate in Skokie Illinois, a move widely protested by the large Jewish community residing there. The group won the right to demonstrate in the Supreme Court, in National Socialist Party of America v. Village of Skokie, but ultimately marched instead in Marquette Park, Chicago. During his tenure as leader of the movement, it was learned by party members that Collin’s father was Jewish and had been held at the concentration camp in Dachau, Germany. In addition, Collin was arrested by Michigan police for having inappropriate relations with young boys in 1979. Both of these factors led to his removal from office and likewise from the group.
Item 1: Interview, 1971.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Collin discusses his beliefs and those of the National Socialist Party of America.
Subject/Index Terms:
National Socialist Party of America.
Item 2: Interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Collin discusses his beliefs and those of the National Socialist Party of America.
Subject/Index Terms:
National Socialism--United States.
Segregation--United States.
White supremacy movements--United States.
Series 28: National States Rights PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: J.B. Stoner, 1924-2005.Add to your cart.
Biography: J.B. Stoner (1924-2005) was an American segregationist. In 1980, he was convicted of the June 19, 1958 bombing of the Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Stoner founded the National Anti-Jewish Party, which intended to drive Jews out of the United States. He also published in the newsletter of the party, The Thunderbolt. Although Stoner had attempted to run as a Democrat to promote his white supremacist agenda, he was not successful in doing so.
Item 1: Speech. Meeting of the National States Rights Party in Chicago, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. J.B. Stoner speaks to a meeting of the National States Rights Party in Chicago.
Subject/Index Terms:
National States Rights Party (U.S.)
Socialist Workers Party.
United Nations.
Batista y Zaldívar, Fulgencio, 1901-1973.
Castro, Fidel, 1926-
Dewey, Thomas E. (Thomas Edmund), 1902-1971.
Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.
Goldwater, Barry M. (Barry Morris), 1909-1998.
Jenner, William E. (William Ezra), 1908-1985.
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
Kasper, John, 1929-1998.
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963.
Khruschev, Nikita Segeevich, 1894-1971.
McCarthy, Joseph, 1908-1957.
Miller, William, 1914-1983.
Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994.
Oppenheimer, J. Robert, 1904-1967.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Jews, Russian.
Jews--Segregation.
Series 29: New LeftAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Karl Hess, 1923-1994.Add to your cart.
Biography: Karl Hess (1923-1994) was a speechwriter, philosopher, and author noted for his shift from extreme right politics to the extreme left. Hess worked and wrote speeches for Barry Goldwater, and is generally considered the author of Goldwater’s alienating statement about extremism in defending liberty not being a vice. After Goldwater’s defeat for the presidency in 1964 Hess was offered a position with the Republican Party but declined it. He subsequently moved to the radical political left and became hostile towards big business and the military industrial complex and embraced anarchistic tendencies. He advocated the “back to the land” movement which embraced a return to community and self-reliance. Hostile to the IRS, Hess was charged with tax resistance and subsequently had a 100% lien put on any earnings.
Item 1: Speech, Pacifica Radio. 'State of Liberty Today', 6 October 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Karl Hess, a self-described anarchist, was a former speech writer for Barry Goldwater during the 1964 presidential campaign. Hess turned from national party politics to become a vocal opponent of the powers of government.  An early supporter of the Libertarian Party and member of the Students for a Democratic Society and the Black Panther groups, he sought to decrease the power of government’s interference in the lives of individuals.  He puts forward the idea of revolution and if the United States is ready for another revolution.
Subject/Index Terms:
Black Panther Party.
Goldwater, Barry M. (Barry Morris), 1909-1998.
Activism.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Anti-war demonstrations.
Civil rights and socialism.
Civil rights movements.
Nation-state.
Student movements.
Campaign debates--United States.
Libertarianism--United States.
Presidents--United States--Election--1964.
Indian occupation, 1973.
Sub-Series 2: Herbert Marcuse, 1898-1979.Add to your cart.
Biography: Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979) was born and raised in Germany. After serving in the German army during WWI, he earned a Ph. D in literature in 1922 and began his work in political philosophy. A Marxist, he fled the Third Reich that rose to power in Germany in 1934 and relocated to the United States. After serving in the Office of Strategic Services during WWII, he transferred to the Department of State as head of the Central European section until 1951. He then began a teaching career, and served at Harvard, Yale, and other universities. Although he was a Marxist, he was highly critical of the Soviet Union, which he believed was mired in bureaucracy. In 1964 One-Dimensional Man was published and became his best-known work. He considered capitalism oppressive and the cause of singular thoughts which decreased opposition. He was labeled a leader in the "new left," (the radical movements of the 1960s), a classification that he dismissed.
Item 1: Discussion, Pacifica Radio, 'One Dimensional Man', 29 June 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Herbert Marcuse, a politics and philosophy professor at Brandeis University, discusses his book One-Dimensional Man with John Simon and an unnamed interviewer. He voices his concerns with capitalism; how it restricts opposition and individualism with tendencies heading toward totalitarianism. As the Father of the New Left he was a favored lecturer among students radicals.
Subject/Index Terms:
Goldwater, Barry M. (Barry Morris), 1909-1998.
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
Mills, C. Wright (Charles Wright), 1916-1962.
Arts and society.
Capitalism.
Censorship.
Communism and society.
Communism.
Existentialism.
Information society.
Intangible property.
Libertarianism.
Mass media policy.
Propaganda, Capitalism.
Social rights.
Discourse analysis--Social aspects.
Labor movement--United States--History--20th century.
Mass media--Political aspects.
Motion pictures--Censorship--United States--History.
Series 30: October LeagueAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Roberta PeskinAdd to your cart.
Biography:  Roberta Peskin was a speaker for the October League.
Item 1: Speech. The October League, 28 November 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Roberta Peskin was a speaker for the October League.  In this recording there is a Q & A between Peskin and her audience over what the League is and what kind of issues it covers. The last convention of the Students for a Democratic Society took place in the fall of 1969, which subsequently led to the split of the Revolutionary Youth Movement (RYM) as well. While one section of the RYM became Weathermen, the other became RYM II, which was Maoist-oriented and rejected the Weathermen's philosophy about armed struggle in the United States. RYM II was at the origin of the October League. The League's influence was strongly linked with established civil rights organizations.
Subject/Index Terms:
Capitalism.
Communism.
Left-wing extremists.
Marx, Karl, 1818-1893.
Meany, George, 1894-1980.
Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994.
October League (M-L)
Revolutionary Youth Movement II (SDS)
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Working class--United States.
Series 31: Revolutionary UnionAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Shelly Bogen and Tim Devine.Add to your cart.
Biography: In 1973, Tim Devine was a graduate working in Chicago and Shelly Bogen a senior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She was active in the Attica Brigade movements. The Attica Brigade first appeared in New York on November 6, 1971 when about 800 students marched with banners on an anti-war demonstration. It became an anti-imperialist organization in 1972 with a main focus to sensitizing university students to the threat of imperialism. The Revolutionary Union initiated that grouping in 1974. The Attica Brigade changed its name to the Revolutionary Student Brigade. As a whole, the Revolutionary Student Brigade stands for a revolutionary overthrow of the capitalist system and the institution of a socialist society that produces control to the efforts of their labor. Bogan argues on the importance of student movements to develop a powerful force to develop an understanding to become fighting allies in the fight against imperialism.
Item 1: Speech at Illinois State University, 5 December 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Tim Devine and Shelly Bogen are spokespersons for the Revolutionary Union and Attica Brigade, respectively. Both are anti-imperialist and anti-capitalist movements seeking to violently, if necessary, overthrow the dictatorship of the bourgeoisie. Struggling workers, blacks, students and women movements should unite against their common enemy: the capitalists. Some of their activities include supporting union strikes, aiding farm workers, organizing a new communist party in the U.S., rallying for the womens movement, working against the war in Vietnam, and civil rights.
Subject/Index Terms:
Attica Brigade.
Revolutionary Communist Youth Brigade (U.S.)
Revolutionary Student Brigade.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Communist ethics.
Revolutionaries.
Socialism.
United States.
Communism--United States.
Political activists--United States.
Student movements--United States--History--20th century.
Students--Political activity--United States.
Series 32: Rosenberg TrialAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Helen Sobell, 1918-2002, Morton Sobell,, 1917-Add to your cart.
Biography: Morton Sobell (1917-) was an engineer who worked on military and government projects and was believed to have committed espionage in passing sensitive information to the Soviet Union, working with Julius Rosenberg to do so. He fled with his wife and others to Mexico in 1950 but was returned to the United States and arrested. He was found guilty and sentenced to 30 years imprisonment; he was released after serving 17 years. He maintained his innocence for decades and was the subject of media and other attention. In 2008, at 91 years of age he finally admitted to passing non-nuclear secret information to the Soviet Union in WWII. Helen L. Sobell (1918-2002) was the wife of Morton Sobell and worked with him at General Electric. She fled with him to Mexico after they were believed to be passing military and technical information to the Soviet Union and was returned to the United States with him. She was not prosecuted and worked to clear his name and obtain his release. Morton was released in 1969; they were divorced in 1980.
Item 1: Interview, Pacifica Radio. 'The Rosenberg Trial', 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Morton Sobell, who spent time in Alcatraz for his involvement in the Rosenberg case, and Helen Sobell provide details of discrepancies, lies and insufficient evidence in the Rosenberg trial. The Sobells denounce Louis Nizer's book The Implosion Conspiracy, a book supportive of the governments position in the Rosenberg trial and conclude that the case was a government 'frame-up' to instill fear in liberals and to show the world that the United States was tough on communism.
Subject/Index Terms:
Rosenberg family.
Nizer, Louis, 1902-1994.
Rosenberg, Ethel, 1915-1953.
Rosenberg, Julius, 1918-1953.
Conspiracy theories.
Trials (Espionage)
Series 33: SocialismAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Robert Lynch, John Mayer, Dan Raskin, and Judy White.Add to your cart.
Item 1: Interview.  WNAC Boston Companion Station 68, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Cambridge Committee to End the War in Vietnam representatives interviewed on ‘Boston Comment’ radio show.
Subject/Index Terms:
Student movements.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest Movements--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Norman Thomas, 1884-1968.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Norman Thomas (1884-1968) was ordained a Presbyterian minister after graduating from Princeton University in 1905, and openly spoke out against U. S. participation in WWI. He became active in the Socialist Party of America in 1917 and was a conscientious objector. He later helped form what became the American Civil Liberties Union. Thomas advocated keeping the United States out of future large-scale conflicts as war clouds formed over Europe again in the late 1930s. Eventually backing the entry of the U. S. into WWII after Pearl Harbor, he became a part of the non–Communist left afterwards and opposed the military-industrial complex and spoke out against the Vietnam War.
Item 1: Lecture at Stanford University, 28 February 1967.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Norman Thomas was an American socialist party leader and a pacifist. Thomas ran for U.S. President six times on the Socialist Party ticket, is speaking at a symposium entitled Problems of the Great Society at Stanford University in 1967. As a conscientious objector during WWI, Thomas speech is titled Is There a Possibility of Peace. Thomas discusses the institution of war, mans aggression and violence; he outlines what steps need to be taken to create an environment for world peace, and finally addresses the current war in Vietnam.
Subject/Index Terms:
Disarmament.
Peace movements.
War and society.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest Movements--United States.
Series 34: Socialist Workers PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Farrell Dobbs, 1907-1983.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Farrell Dobbs (1907-1983), a Trotskyist joined the teamsters in the early 1930's in Minneapolis. He was one of the leaders in the 1934 Minneapolis truck driver strike. Just as WWII began, Dobbs was working for the SWP and basically opposed the war which led him to be imprisoned. A few years. At the time of this audio recording, he was the national secretary of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP).
Item 1: Speech. The Minneapolis strike of 1934 and the role of the revolutionary party, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  A series of speeches about the 1934 Minneapolis strike and the role of the revolutionary party. Deep unemployment, low wages and the fact that the union was not recognized by many companies lead to a hostile environment. On May 16, 1934 the strike began but violence erupted a few later to the incident known as Bloody Friday. The Minneapolis was a pivotal point in union rights across the Midwest.
Subject/Index Terms:
American Bar Association. Committee on Development of the Law Under National Labor Relations Act.
American Federation of Labor.
Farmer Labor Party.
Belor, John.
Brown, Bill.
Dunne, Vincent.
Green, William, 1870-1952.
Hall, Cliff.
Ness, Henry.
O'Brien, John T., 'Sandy'
Olson, Floyd B., 1891-1936.
Pelley, William Dudley, 1890-1965.
Skoglund, Carl, 1884-1960.
Tobin, Daniel Joseph, 1875-1955.
Wagner, Robert F. (Robert Ferdinand), 1877-1953.
Anti-globalization movement.
Civil rights demonstration.
Labor union democracy.
National socialism and labor.
Radicalism.
Social conflict.
Socialism.
Syndicalism.
Truck Drivers' Strike, Minneapolis, Minn., 1934.
Unemployment.
Collective bargaining--Transportation.
Communism--United States.
Labor movement--United States--History--20th century.
Working class--United States.
Series 35: Statecraft MovementAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Daniel Paulson and Charles B. Baker, 26 April 1969.Add to your cart.
Biography:  Daniel Paulson and C. B. Baker formed Statecraft as an offshoot of other rightwing organizations and met at a Young Americans for Freedom (YAF)rally. They believed that YAF and other organizations such as the KKK lacked intelligence or the courage to act. They believed that society needed to be rid of its unproductive members and that a revolution by force and violence was necessary and that they themselves should decide what the future government of the United States should be.
Item 1: Interview. Perspectives from the Statecraft movement, 26 April 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Founders of the Statecraft movement speak at Statecraft headquarters.
Subject/Index Terms:
Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
Revolutionaries.
Black power--United States.
Blacks--Segregation.
Liberalism--United States--20th century--History.
Series 36: Student Committee for Travel to CubaAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Phillip Abbott Luce, 1938-1998.Add to your cart.
Biography: Phillip Abbott Luce (1935-1998) was then the chairman of the Student Committee for Travel to Cuba. He had traveled to Cuba under the auspices of the pro-Red Chinese Progressive Labor Party. As a result, he was indicted. Others students who went to Cuba and he, testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee.
Item 1: Interview. News about the student committee for travel to Cuba, 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  Phillip Abbott Luce of the Executive Committee of the Student Committee for travel to Cuba, served as leader and one of several spokespersons, including Eddie Lemansky took students to Cuba, including eleven black people. Luce and Albert Maher defied the State Department ban on travel to Cuba. Once they return, they were informed that their passports were temporarily invalidated. One critical issue was raised when asked about the expenses of the trip, about which the witnesses denied that they were expected by the Cuban Government to disseminate in the United States propaganda favorable to the Communist regime in Cuba and in other countries. As a result, several students were handed a subpoena to appear before the House of Un-American Activities Committee.
Subject/Index Terms:
Black United Liberation Front.
Cuban Federation of University Students.
Progressive Labor Movement (Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.)
Student Committee for Travel to Cuba.
United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-American Activities.
Berrard, Charles.
Bond, Yvonne.
Castro, Fidel, 1926-
Goldwater, Barry M. (Barry Morris), 1909-1998.
Kennedy, Robert F., 1928-1968.
Lemansky, Eddie.
Maher, Albert.
Valdez, Luis Miguel.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Factory farms.
Socialism.
Communism--China.
Communism--Cuba.
Migrant labor--United States.
Series 37: Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Robb Burlage, 1937-, Tom Hayden, 1939-, and Lee Webb.Add to your cart.
Biography: Tom Hayden (1939 -) became interested in political activism while in college. He rapidly established a relationship with the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) organization and cemented his place in the New Left when he drafted the SDS Port Huron statement. Hayden also become involved in protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention and was part of the “Chicago Eight” indicted on conspiracy charges. Later he made several visits to North Vietnam. After the Vietnam War he ran for political office and served in the California State Assembly and State Senate. He continues to serve in organizations such as the Progressive Democrats of America and to write, speak, and teach. Robb Burlage (1937-) was a Harvard graduate student studying economics. He became deeply involved with the Students for a Democratic Society organization and wrote several key works for the organization, most notably “This is War,” on the subject of poverty in Appalachia. He also wrote other works about economic history in the southern United States, including "The South as an Underdeveloped Country." Lee Webb was a key member of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). He served as national secretary and participated in many of the group’s activities. He later served as president of the organization.
Item 1: Interview at SDS Annual Convention, 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Tom Hayden, Lee Webb and Robb Burlage were interviewed by WBAI radio announcer Larry Birns in a dormitory at the SDS summer convention. They explain the history of their group, its current membership and organization, the through-provoking position papers they have written and sponsored, and major sources of funding for the SDS. At the time of the interview the SDS was primarily involved with community organizing especially in demands for job creation for the poor. The SDS was to offer college students an opportunity to work for change in our society, similar to the recently formed Peace Corps. In 1964 the SDS had about 500 members and 25 chapters with its most active in Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Louisville, Newark, Philadelphia, Trenton and Chester, PA (Swarthmore), each with its own community project.
Subject/Index Terms:
League for Industrial Democracy.
New Left.
Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
Union for Jobs or Income Now (Chicago, Ill.)
Sinclair, Upton, 1878-1968.
College students--Political activity--History--20th century.
Student movements--United States--History--20th century.
Student movements--United States.
Student movements--Vietnam--History--20th century.
Students--Political activity--United States.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest Movements--United States.
American Nazi Party.
Sub-Series 2: Unknown.Add to your cart.
Item 1: Rally. Students for a Democratic Society, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  A member of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) speaks about they call the movement and the reasons why he is against the war. He sees a sense of demoralization and a social fabric that has been torn apart in Vietnam, a country that has destroyed not only physically but also socially. He further expands his point of views on economy democracy, not discounting the fact that as long as changes in the economic system and in the foreign policy of the United States do not take place, corporations will continue to drive their own interests for greater profits. The rally continues on with a series of questions and answers about the speaker's ideologies and values.
Subject/Index Terms:
Bennett, Charles Edward, 1910-2003.
Ho, Chi Minh, 1890-1969.
Hughes, Richard J. (Richard Joseph), 1909-1992.
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978.
Ky, Nguyen Cao.
Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Anti-war demonstrations.
Communism and society.
Propaganda, Capitalism.
Civil rights--United States.
Democracy--Economic aspects.
Equality--United States.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest Movements--United States.
Sub-Series 3: Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John MayerAdd to your cart.
Biography: Judith White and Steve Chase were members of the Young Socialist Alliance, Cynthia Wegman was a member of the Students for a Democratic Society, and John Mayer was a member of the May 2nd Movement.
Item 1: Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer interview, 27 May 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Haywood Vincent radio broadcast in which Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer debate with Gordon Hall.
Subject/Index Terms:
Communism.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Student movements--United States.
Series 38: World Socialist PartyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Karla Ellenbogen, William Jerome, Harry Morrison.Add to your cart.
Item 1: Symposium. Several speakers presenting various tenets of socialism, 16 October 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  In a public symposium of the World Socialist Party four speakers explain various tenets of socialism. Karla Ellenbogen explains why socialism provides a better government. William Jerome answers, What is Socialism? Harry Morrison explains the superiority of Marxian economics while decrying the exploitation of capitalism. William Jerome returns to differentiate real socialist theory versus the way socialism is practiced in the USSR. Finally, a vaguely identified comrade speaker denounces materialism in our society.
Subject/Index Terms:
World Socialist Party of the United States.
Competition.
Madole, James Hartung, 1927-1979.
Rockwell, George Lincoln, 1918-1967.
Wallace, George C. (George Corley), 1919-1998.
Anti-globalization movement.
Marxian economics.
Materialism.
Socialism.
Unemployment.
Socialism--Russia (Federation)
Working class--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Harry Morrison, 1912-2004.Add to your cart.
Biography: Harry Morrison came to the United States from Canada in 1937. He was the National Secretary for the World Socialist Party (WSP), until he developed heart problems in his late middle ages.
Item 1: Interview, 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library.  Harry Morrison, national secretary of the World Socialist Party, is interviewed on the radio by Haywood Vincent about socialism and communism.
Subject/Index Terms:
Communism.
Socialism.
Series 39: Young Americans for FreedomAdd to your cart.
Series 1: Unknown.Add to your cart.
Item 1: Opinion on the differences in ideology between the YAF and the SDS, 15 May 1969.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location.  A student leader in the Young Americans for Freedom (YAF) at Boston University defends the position of his group against the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) takeover of the University's financial aid. He advocates for the disruptive parties to be removed from campus for trespassing, damage of property and disruption of classes. The majority of his speech centers on the differences in ideology between the YAF and the SDS. The YAF is opposed to socialism, welfare, minimum wage, and campus affirmative action. The YAF advocates for capitalism, ROTC on campus and individual rights.
Subject/Index Terms:
Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
Capitalism.
Libertarian literature.
Recruiting and enlistment.
Affirmative action programs--United States.
Libertarianism--United States.
Student movements--United States.
Series 40: Young Socialist AllianceAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Jack Barnes, 1940-Add to your cart.
Biography: Jack Barnes (1940 -) was a member of the Young Socialist alliance. He got involved with the organization while at Carleton College and quickly attracted attention within the organization. Barnes was appointed chairman of the Young Socialist alliance at the organization’s convention in January of 1965; this move generated contention within the party due to his young age and inexperience compared to other more senior members who felt slighted. The party eventually fell into decline and some members believed that the beginning of the descent was the appointment of Barnes and other inexperienced leadership.
Item 1: Speech. Young Socialist Alliance Convention, 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Jack Barnes, a member of the Young Socialists Alliance is speaking at their convention. Much of his speech concerns the Bloomington, IN students who were arrested and charged with sedition. He touches on the assassination of President John Kennedy, the efforts of U. S. capitalists to suppress other economies, and labor militancy.
Subject/Index Terms:
Bingham, Jim.
Hoadley, Thomas.
Levitt, Ralph.
Morgan, Tom.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Proletariat.
Trials (Sedition)
Anti-communist movements--United States.
Working class--United States.
Sub-Series 2: Peter Miguel Camejo, 1939-2008.Add to your cart.
Biography: Peter Camejo (aka Pedro Camejo, 1939-2008) was a member of the political left. In the 1960s, he was a member of the Young Socialist Alliance and later active in the Free Speech Movement. He later ended up on California Governor Ronald Regans list of the 10 most dangerous people in California. He was also a member of and later expelled from the Socialist Workers Party and was active in the Green Party. He ran for Governor of California several times in the first decade of the 21st Century and became active in socially responsible investing.
Item 1: Speech at a convention, 1964.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Peter Camejo, a member of the Young Socialist Alliance and later leader of the United States Socialist Workers Party, attacks capitalism and demands that every persons civil liberties must be upheld. On the second tape Camejo and others review civil liberties and efforts to infringe on those liberties on university campuses, especially at Berkeley and Bloomington, IN.
Subject/Index Terms:
Bloomington Defense Committee (Bloomington, Ind.)
Young Socialist Alliance (U.S.)
Bingham, Jim.
Hoadley, Thomas.
Levitt, Ralph.
Morgan, Tom.
Anti-globalization movement.
Civil rights and socialism.
Democracy.
Socialism.
Student movements--United States.
Sub-Series 3: Maceo Dixon, 1950-2012.Add to your cart.
Biography: Maceo Dixon (1950-2012) was a member of the Young Socialist Alliance. He believed in that organization's superiority over other socialist organizations, which he was critical of. He was also critical of China and the USSR, and stated that Cuba was the country that had thus far become a true socialist government. He believed in the early 1970s that discontent on the part of the workers-- a group in which he included virtually everyone but the ruling elite-- was about to generate a critical mass and create a socialist revolution in the United States. He believed that such a revolution was impossible to implement peacefully, as that the holders of the status quo would not give up peacefully.
Item 1: Spokesman for Young Socialist Alliance at Illinois State University, 10 December 1973.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May be accessed from any location. Question and answer format with Maceo Dixon, a leader in the Young Socialist alliance, and a believer in organized social movements to advance justice and equality. He cites past instances where protests proved to be an effective means to forward social action: voting rights, abortion rights, workers unions, and Vietnam protests. A Trotskyite socialist he advocates the demise of capitalism, investigation of high level political corruption, and continued work for black liberation. Dixon condemns the Paris Peace accords, our ties to Arab oil and imperialism.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-imperialist movements.
Black Liberation.
Civil rights and socialism.
Civil rights movements.
Labor unions.
Oil industries.
Propaganda, Capitalism.
Student movements.
United Farm Workers of America.
Blacks--Civil rights.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Peace.
Sub-Series 4: Antonio Camejo, Bob Doyle, Gus Horowitz, and William (Bill) SacksAdd to your cart.
Biography: In 1969 and through the first half of 1970, Gus Horowitz was the national anti-war director of the United States Socialist Workers' Party (SWP). On Labor Day weekend in 1969, in New York, the Socialist Workers Party held its national convention. Horowitz had initiated the discussion on a resolution assessing developments within the movement against the Vietnam War and the role of the SWP within that movement. The May 2nd movement was formed to fight and revolt against the politics at the time that the government led in the war in Vietnam. The first major student demonstrations against the war in Vietnam took place on May 2, 1964. Students demonstrated in Time Square, in New York City against US intervention in South Vietnam. Students and young people also demonstrated in San Francisco, Madison, Seattle, and elsewhere throughout the U.S. Demonstrations were to denounce the lies of a government of socially creative forces, a military machine that enforced violence, and ultimately, its imperialistic conduct. Bob Doyle was an independent student who sympathizes with student demonstrating groups. Bill Sacks was a May 2nd Movement member.
Item 1: Antonio Camejo, Bob Doyle, Gus Horowitz, and William (Bill) Sacks interview, 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Gus Horowitz and Tony Camejo speak about the Young Socialist Alliance, a Trotskyist group of the the 1960’s in the United States. Horowitz and Cameyo’s philosophy of socialism comes from Marx’s socialism, Trotsky, and in the tradition of Engels and Lenin, extending to Eugene Debs. They are commenting on different aspects of the Young Socialist Alliance, including young students and workers involvement in terms of unemployment issues, problems of war, racism, and fascism in the United States. Bill Sacks speaks on the May 2nd movement. Bob Doyle is an independent student who sympathizes with student demonstrating groups.
Subject/Index Terms:
May 2nd Movement.
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926.
Trotsky, Leon, 1879-1940.
Anti-imperialist movements.
Anti-racism.
Political activists.
Race discrimination.
Unemployment.
Student movements--United States.
Sub-Series 5: Gus Horowitz and Bill Sacks.Add to your cart.
Biography: In 1969 and through the first half of 1970, Gus Horowitz was the national anti-war director of the United States Socialist Workers' Party (SWP). On Labor Day weekend in 1969, in New York, the Socialist Workers Party held its national convention. Horowitz had initiated the discussion on a resolution assessing developments within the movement against the Vietnam War and the role of the SWP within that movement. Bill Sacks was a May 2nd Movement member.
Item 1: Gus Horowitz and Bill Sacks interview, undated.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Young Socialists Alliance members (Horowitz and others) and May 2nd Movement member Bill Sacks answer questions on a radio call-in show.
Subject/Index Terms:
Anti-imperialist movements.
Anti-racism.
Political activists.
Race discrimination.
Unemployment.
Student movements--United States.
Sub-Series 6: Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer.Add to your cart.
Biography: Judith White and Steve Chase were members of the Young Socialist Alliance, Cynthia Wegman was a member of the Students for a Democratic Society, and John Mayer was a member of the May 2nd Movement.
Item 1: Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer interview, 27 May 1965.Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
May only be accessed from workstations in Milner Library. Haywood Vincent radio broadcast in which Judith White, Steve Chase, Cynthia Wegman, and John Mayer debate with Gordon Hall.
Subject/Index Terms:
Communism.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975.
Student movements--United States.

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[Series 8: Christian Crusade],
[Series 9: Christian Defense League],
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[Series 34: Socialist Workers Party],
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[Series 36: Student Committee for Travel to Cuba],
[Series 37: Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)],
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